Category Archives: Realtor

Selling your home? Should you accept the offer or not? – 15

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If you are selling your home, this podcast will help you to evaluate whether to accept a buyer offer or not. For more information contact Joe Santoro or Nick Santoro of Personal Property Managers at www.personalpropertymanagers.com

Personal Property Managers specializes in: Home Downsizing, Home Cleanout Services, Estate Sales, Home Content Liquidation, Property Management, Absentee Home Watch, Moving, Full Service Discount Real Estate Services, Home Sales, Home Buyer Services, and Elder Care Services. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all.

 

 

 

Should you accept the buyer offer on your home?

Great news! You have a contract on your house. Do you take it?

So…your house is on the market. You’re ready to sell. You have done your homework. You have decluttered it and cleaned it up. You have staged it and had great pictures taken. Now it’s show time. More good news. You just received your first signed offer to buy your house. You’re thrilled. Right? So, what’s the problem? Should you take it?

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This is part of an on-going series of real estate articles by Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managerswho service Pennsylvania and New Jersey and specialize in buying and selling homes, the real estate industry, home content downsizing, property management and estate sales.

Naturally, if you have received an all cash, as is, quick close, full price offer, you should jump on it. But, as we all know this rarely happens. In this brief article, we’ll share with you some things to consider when a buyer makes an offer on your home.

After the initial excitement of receiving a written offer, home sellers need to take a close look at the details. We are talking about looking beyond just the offer price.
Nick Santoro says, “You should look at every offer the same way, whether you have one offer or multiple offers.” Nick points out that anyone can write anything in a contract, so it’s up to your listing agent to check out whether the buyer is truly qualified.

Sellers automatically look first at the purchase price. Nick shares that other factors should have equal weight. Financing is an important consideration.
“A lender letter should be attached to every offer, so your agent can contact that lender and ask about the buyer’s qualifications,” Santoro says.
A home sellers listing agents will want to know if the loan is fully documented; if the lender foresees any credit problems and if the buyer’s cash is in the bank. Joe Santoro recommends requesting a document called a BFI or buyers financial statement, which includes income, debt and assets, including the cash needed for the purchase.

Nick suggests that you compare the mortgage preapproval letter and the buyer purchase offer to make sure the buyers are fully approved to borrow as much as they need.
Joe Santoro, co-founder of Personal Property Managers points out that virtually all buyer offers include contingencies on the buyer’s financing, home inspection and appraisal. Joe points out that the more contingencies there are, the more opportunities there are for the buyers to walk away.

Here are four Buyer and Seller contingencies that should be reviewed carefully:

Buyer Financing. The financing contingency should be 21 days or less, If someone makes a full-price offer but they need 60 days to tie up their financing, they’re asking you to take your home off the market while they figure out how to buy it.

Buyer Home inspection. The home inspection contingency should take place in 7 to 10 days at most. A seller can choose to sell their house “as is” and agree to an inspection that allows the buyer to walk away if they don’t like the report but doesn’t allow negotiations for repairs. Buyers who bid up the price on a house sometimes try to use the inspection as a way to lower it back down by having the seller subtract the cost of repairs from the price. Joe Santoro points out that often times, a buyer home inspection, done by a third party is often where a deal breaks down. Every seller thinks their house is perfect and nothing needs to be done to it, and certainly does not want to pay for any repairs as they are leaving anyway. Conversely, every buyer wants to buy a house that they feel is perfect and wants all home inspection issues addressed in fully. This is not always possible or particle. If you have never sold a house before, a buyer home inspection report often is about 40 pages in length and can scare away both buyers and seller. It is not meant to be this way, but is often taken as an insult. Diplomacy and negotiations are the key here.

Buyer lender appraisal. The appraisal contingency should be 21 days or less, An agreement of sale can be fully accepted by both buyer and seller but it can fall apart if the buyers lender when conducting a market analysis and appraisal feels that the house is worth less than it may be listed for and agreed upon. No bank or lender will lend mortgage money on a property that is valued less than the home purchase price. We recommend making sure the buyer has enough cash to bring extra money to closing if the appraisal comes in low. Otherwise, the seller would have to reduce the price or split the difference with the buyer.

Settlement date. Typically, closing is set for 30 to 45 days after the contract is accepted. If a buyer asks for a longer term, it could be that they are not financially ready. A longer settlement gives the buyer more time to back out, which could force the seller to put their home back on the market. If the seller is moving into a new house, the settlement date is crucial. A seller doesn’t want to be caught between two houses with furnishings in storage or paying two mortgages at once.

A substantial deposit shows the buyer’s desire for your home, while a small deposit makes it easier for them to walk away. It also may signal that they have very little cash and that they’re stretching to buy the house.

Some sellers are so relieved to receive an offer that they say yes to the first one they get. That’s not necessarily bad, depending on the market.

Some sellers are afraid they won’t get another offer, but if it’s the first weekend on the market, they may want to wait a few days.

For multiple offers, compare prices and terms to determine which one makes the most sense for your situation. Your agent will negotiate with the buyer’s agent, but you decide what to haggle over.

“It’s always best to negotiate on the least amount of details,” Joe says.
Nick says that If the price is lower than you want, we recommend that your agent go back to the buyer’s agent with a comparative market analysis (CMA) and specifics about your home to show why it’s priced as it is.

“Sometimes sellers think they need a perfect offer and won’t accept one if it’s slightly under the asking price,” Santoro says.

Nick said that he has had sellers who refused to accept an offer very close and or just under list price, only to have it sit on the market for a much longer time than anticipated, only to have an anxious seller panic and accept less money. Time is money as taxes, insurance and utility bills keep mounting. All these things need to be factored into the decision to accept or decline all reasonable offers.

“It’s possible to end up with nothing if a seller gets too greedy,” says Santoro. “If you have a willing and able buyer who can afford to buy your house and is within reason of your listing price, you should try to make it work. If you don’t, you could end up with a lower offer later.”

So all buyer offers are dependent upon many factors as noted above. In addition, there are many factors to consider on the seller side too. Factors such as how long the house is on the market. The amount of work that will need to be done to the house. Market comps. Whether or not the seller is carrying two mortgages or not; their new house and the one they are trying to sell. All of these factors must be considered when making your decision to accept a buyer offer or not.

Personal Property Managers, can take care of all your home selling needs along with downsizing, content liquidation and renovation work. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all. For more insights, tips and videos please visit our Resource Page in the About us tab.

For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with EveryHome Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.

Staging your home to appeal to Millennial buyers – 14

staging for millennials

This podcast will share 8 useful tips and steps that you can use to successfully stage your home to appeal to millennial buyers. For more information contact Joe Santoro or Nick Santoro of Personal Property Managers at www.personalpropertymanagers.com

Personal Property Managers specializes in: Home Downsizing, Home Cleanout Services, Estate Sales, Home Content Liquidation, Property Management, Absentee Home Watch, Moving, Full Service Discount Real Estate Services, Home Sales, Home Buyer Services, and Elder Care Services. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all.

 

How much is your house really worth? Top 3 home valuation methods

What is the valuation of your home?

You are probably aware that that the Greater Philly and New Jersey housing market is doing well right now, but do you know how much your house is worth in today’s market? When we often met with clients, like lots of people, they have gone online prior to our meeting and looked up the value of their home, so they thought; right? Does this describe you?

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It’s pretty easy. Google your address and like magic, up pops several online sites that will provide information on your house, such as number of bedrooms and bathroom and square footage. Sometimes they even show a picture of your home and sometimes they even will show an estimated valuation price of what your home may be worth. For a lot of people they take this number as gospel and look to us for verification of this number. Sometimes the estimated valuation number is close to the correct value of their home, but other times it’s way off. Did you know that the CEO of one of the largest online home sites sold his home a while back, and that he sold it for 40% less than what his own site said the home was worth?

This is part of an on-going series of real estate articles by Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managerswho service Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Personal Property Managers is a home sale specialist maximizing the sales value of our clients property, and also provides home content downsizing, senior transition services, property management and estate sales.

These online sites have many different names for their rough home valuations. Did you know that they often fail to take into consideration floor plans, swimming pools, frontage, interior and exterior updates and upgrades? Please do not make the mistake of hitting the market without an expert valuation from a local Realtor who takes everything into account when pricing your home for sale.

Nick Santoro says that when you value homes, there are three methods that you should use to determine a property’s value. Whether or not you plan to sell your home any time soon, knowing the value of your home is often the starting point for making wise financial decisions.

Another factor that is very important to consider is that almost all buyers will need some form of financing such as a mortgage. We are sharing with you the top 3 methods that they use when determining a homes valuation and thus the amount of mortgage that they will provide and approve. They are:

1. The Cost Approach
The cost approach works by analyzing what it would cost to build the property in today’s market, adding the current value of the parcel of land on which it sits and then subtracting a factor for obsolescence or depreciation. This method is rarely impactful as resale homes are heavily influenced by supply and demand. If there are too many homes for sale, cost will have no bearing on valuations, as sellers will have to compete to get them sold. Fortunately, the opposite is true as well. If there are too few homes on the market, buyers very well might have to pay a premium to have a seller part with her property.

2. The Income Approach
The income approach is typically used with investment properties. The net income a property generates (net operating income) is used to derive a market value based on a multiple of the property’s annual income. Generally speaking, the more income a property generates, the more it is worth.

3. The Sales Comparison Approach
The sales comparison approach, also known as the market approach, works by looking at the supply and demand for similar homes. We look at similar homes that are for sale, the selling prices of similar properties that have recently changed hands, and how many similar homes that have failed to sell recently.

It is important to look at homes on an apples to apples comparison. We are talking about comparing the number of bedrooms, number of bathrooms, home style, square footage, lot size, school district, location, updates and upgrades, curb appeal, roof, HVAC systems, overall condition, geographic proximity to your home / subject property. Also look at what may need to be done to the property to bring it up to current market demand conditions, and the cost to do so.

Additionally, many clients look at the price that other homes are listed for in their area. This is a mistake. This may be fine for an overall feel, but the real measure is looking at what similar homes have actually sold for. This is what your lenders will be looking at. It often does not matter what houses are listed for, what really matters is what similar houses have sold for. As licensed Realtors, we can share this analysis with you by conducting something called a Comparative Market Analysis or CMA.

The prices of homes are then adjusted upwards or downwards based upon how they compare with other properties that have sold, are listed and the overall condition of the property in comparison to other like properties; then, by averaging the prices of the comparable properties, an appropriate value is determined for the subject property.

The Best Method
To find the real value of your home, you should use all three approaches, but heavily weigh the findings from the sales comparison approach.

Remember, all markets are subject to supply and demand, and if more supply is needed, then the cost of creating additional supply will affect the values of the supply that is already in the market, over the long run.

Following the methods above will help you determine an accurate value for your home. Then, with an understanding of current market factors, you can develop a well-informed strategy regarding when to sell and buy a home.

If you need help coming up with a plan or determining your home’s value, please give us a call or look us up on the net at http://www.personalpropertymanagers.com We are home sale specialists. We not only can help you sell your property at the best possible price, but we also offer a best in class seller acceleration program to help get your home ready for sale by downsizing and de-cluttering it and helping to liquidate the contents. For a truly one call does it all solution, contact us today for a free evaluation.

For more insights, tips and videos please visit our Resource Page in the About us tab.

For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with EveryHome Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.

Tips to think about before investing in real estate

Are you thinking about investing in real estate? You will want to think carefully about what, where and for how much you want to buy, is now more important than ever. Investing in property is the single biggest financial transaction that you will ever conclude and should always be done with great care. There’s more to consider than you think. For starters, property is an active, rather than a passive investment and comes with financial risk.

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Although, buying your own home should first and foremost be about securing your future and creating a foundation upon which to build a life and future for yourself and your family, you should also make sure that you are a making a sound investment.
This is part of a continuing series of articles by Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers, who service Pennsylvania and New Jersey and specialize in real estate, property management, home content downsizing and estate sale services.
Before you begin….Do your homework (top 8 tips)

Whether it is your primary home or a second property such as a rental you should always do your homework thoroughly to mitigate potential risk.

Consider the downside right upfront. When the market turns for example, you might find yourself in a tight financial spot and you have to sell. Think about this when you buy: how hard will it be to sell the property if it comes down to it?

Consider whether you have the time and financial means for this type of investment. If you are purely looking for an investment, then a property fund might be the better choice, especially if you are a novice or first time buyer.

Once you have decided that you are going to take the step and invest in bricks and mortar, be sure to keep these 8 golden rules in mind:

1. Location, location, location – this old adage will always be the primary driver of demand, prices and property values. Research, research, research. Before you sign on the dotted line, chat to local area agents and get the vital statistics and information about the area.

2. Pay a fair price – do not pay more than fair market value unless you are sure that you are financially secure enough to hold onto the property until it starts to accumulate value. Price growth tends to track economic growth quite closely, so if the economy stalls, so do prices.

3. Neighborhood – do a thorough due diligence on the neighborhood and area, especially if you are not familiar with it. Make sure that it is a viable area, more so if you are looking at a second or investment property. Ensure there are good services, roads and communications connectivity for aspects such as internet and satellite television for example

4. Street savvy – don’t stop with the neighborhood, also check out the street (or complex) to ensure you are buying in the right part of the suburb. Be sure to check out the prices in your road (or complex) to compare that you are not paying more. Guard against paying a high price for an overcapitalized home.

5. Facilities and amenities – the better the facilities and amenities in the area, the more in demand the property is likely to be when it comes to either selling or renting it out. A good transport network is important, as are schools and then secondary facilities such as shops and other services.

6. Security – this has become an important consideration for neighborhoods and complexes. The more secure the property and area, the more attractive it is for buyers and tenants. Check out whether there is a neighborhood watch or similar group and ensure that the property itself is adequately secured and insured.

7. Capital value growth and yields – you obviously want to invest in an area where property values grow at least in line with the market average, preferably at an above average rate. If you are investing in a rental, then you will want to check out the rental returns in the area as it is important to budget for any shortfalls. Ensure also that you build fat into your budget for all the hidden costs associated with a rental property.

8. Leisure and attractions – if you are thinking about investing in a holiday rental, then leisure facilities and attractions are important. The closer the property is situated to attractions such as the beach, river or game reserve for example, the more in demand it will be. Consider who your tenants will be and put yourself in their shoes. Where do they want to stay when they book for a holiday for example?

For more insights, tips and videos please visit our Resource Page in the About us tab.

For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with EveryHome Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.

Understanding the Cost of Elder and Senior Care – 12

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This podcast will share facts and insights into the cost of elder and senior care looking into Assisted Living, Nursing Home and In-Home Care Services and how Personal Property Managers can help fund a loved ones long term care. For more information contact Joe Santoro or Nick Santoro of Personal Property Managers at www.personalpropertymanagers.com

Personal Property Managers specializes in: Home Downsizing, Home Cleanout Services, Estate Sales, Home Content Liquidation, Property Management, Absentee Home Watch, Moving, Full Service Discount Real Estate Services, Home Sales, Home Buyer Services, and Elder Care Services. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all.

 

Tips for getting your house market ready to sell – 11

PPM smaller version Podcast - picture - final version 2-13-19

This podcast will share insights and tips into how to prepare to get your house market ready to put it on the market, so that you can get the best possible selling price and sell it in the shortest amount of time. For more information contact Joe Santoro or Nick Santoro of Personal Property Managers at www.personalpropertymanagers.com

Personal Property Managers specializes in: Home Downsizing, Home Cleanout Services, Estate Sales, Home Content Liquidation, Property Management, Absentee Home Watch, Moving, Full Service Discount Real Estate Services, Home Sales, Home Buyer Services, and Elder Care Services. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all.