Advice and insights – Parting with Family Heirlooms

Does anyone want my grandparents stuff?

Bucks County Home Downsizing

Home Downsizing Tips PA NJWe are often contacted by people who, through the death of an elderly loved one, are now faced with trying to unload their familes home contents. If you have never gone through this process, it’s a real eye opener, especially for older members of the family tasked with this chore.

We all have fond memories of growing up and playing at grandmas house and the love and care that she put into the house, along with all the lovely things inside it. Unfortunately, the value of things has changed dramatically over the past few years. Things that were in high regard and value in the past are no longer sought after or even wanted today. Things like porcelin dolls, china, figureenes and such are just viewed as needless clutter today.

Most of the people who contact us, begin by telling us they have a variety of items ranging from kitchen sets, living room sets, bedroom sets, china cabinets filled with all kinds of things, and believe that buyers will want to flock to their home for a chance to buy their contents. Sadly, that’s just not reality today.

Things have really changed over the last few years. Items that people thought were valuable years ago, such as collectable figurines or china cabinets filled with plates and glassware are no longer in style. Furniture that is still functional but is 20 years old is just not in style or in demand today. We have found that 50 is the magic age. People over the age of 50 already have many of the things that people want to sell and do not want any more of it. People under age 50 simply do not have interest in many of the things that people want to sell. It all boils down to style, age, condition and desirability. We always tell people that it does not matter what you paid for it…something is only worth what someone else is willing to pay for it.

This is part of our 2021 best in class continuing series of helpful articles from Joe Santoro and Nick Santoro of Personal Property Managers to assist you in home downsizing, content liquidation and full service discount real estate services. Personal Property Managers services clients in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. During this challenging time in the Corona Virus and COVID-19 era, we help families that are unable travel or tend to their property needs by providing a true one-stop resource. We are focused on making life just a little easier for families during often difficult times. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all.

During this challenging time in the Corona Virus and COVID-19 era, we help families that are unable travel or tend to their property needs by providing a true one-stop resource. We are focused on making life just a little easier for families during often difficult times. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all.

Caregivers and executors of estates quickly learn the hard truth that others in their 50s and 60s need to know: Nobody wants the prized possessions of your parents — not even you or your kids.

The Stuff of Nightmares

Many boomers and Gen X’ers charged with disposing the family heirlooms, it seems, are unprepared for the reality and unwilling to face it. Let’s face it, how many young people do you know that are picking out formal china patterns or want former collectable antiques anymore?

Joe Santoro, says that at least a half dozen times a week, families come to us and say: ‘What do we do with all this stuff?’” The answer: do you know of anyone who may want it, because there is little to no resale value in items such as furniture that is 20 plus years old; and good luck trying to get a charity or thrift store to take your 30 year old bedroom set, dining room set and couches.

Dining room tables and chairs, end tables and armoires have become furniture non grata. Antiques are antiquated. Old mahogany stuff from your great aunt’s house is basically worthless, says Nick Santoro.

What about all the stuff you see on TV shows? On PBS’s Antiques Roadshow, for example, prices for certain types of period furniture have dropped so much that some episode reruns note current, lower estimated appraisals.

And if you’re thinking your grown children will gladly accept your parents’ items, if only for sentimental reasons, you’re likely in for an unpleasant surprise.

Young couples starting out don’t want the same things people used to have according to Joe Santoro, and in fact, they often don’t want anything from grandma’s house. In fact, we have found that around age 50 is the dividing line. People over 50 already have lots of the same stuff that people now want to get rid off and don’t want anymore of it and would like to downsize themselves too. People under the age of 50 simple don’t want older stuff. We now live in the disposable age. Many things, like furniture are must less costly today, so younger people would just rather buy new things and then after about 7 or 8 years simply get rid of it and get newer items all over again, to keep up with changing styles and taste.

The Minimalist Generation

Joe points out that this is an Ikea and Target generation. They live minimally, much more so than the boomers. They don’t have the emotional connection to things that earlier generations did. They are more mobile. So they don’t want a lot of heavy stuff dragging down a move across country for a new opportunity.

Additionally, Nick points out that you can pretty much forget about interesting your grown kids in the books that lined their grandparents’ shelves for decades. If you’re lucky, you might find buyers for some books by having a garage sale, but be prepared to sell a whole box of books for $3.00. In fact, many local libraries will not even take books anymore and certainly not old encyclopedias.

Most antiques dealers (if you can even find one) and auction houses have little appetite for your parents’ stuff, either. That’s because their customers generally aren’t interested.

Even charities like Salvation Army and Goodwill frequently reject donations of home furnishings, we can sadly report from our own personal experience.

6 Tips for Home Unfurnishing

What else can you do to avoid finding yourself forlorn in your late parents’ home, broken up about the breakfront that’s going begging? Some suggestions:

1. Give yourself plenty of time to find takers, if you can. “We tell people: The longer you have to sell something, the more money you’re going to make, of course, this could mean cluttering up your basement, attic or living room with tables, lamps and the like until you finally locate interested parties. Additionally, this could take quite some time and effort to accomplish.

2. Do an online search to see whether there’s a market for your parents’ art, furniture, china or crystal.

3. Get the jewelry appraised. It’s possible that a necklace, ring or brooch has value and could be sold.

4. Look for a nearby consignment shop that might take some items. Again, this takes a lot of time and effort, and don’t forget about the cost and logistic of removing and transporting the contents. None of this is easy.

5. See if someone locally could use what you inherited. Giving stuff away may make you feel better, because trying to sell items takes patience and effort.

6. But perhaps the best advice is: Prepare for disappointment. “For the first time in history of the world, two generations are downsizing simultaneously,” says Joe Santoro, talking about the boomers’ parents and the boomers themselves.

The bottom line is that the younger adult generations simply want something different from their parents. They prefer newer, more contemporary styles and do not want lots of needless clutter.

The good news is that we can help clean-out your house, help downsize your family home and liquidate contents that are saleable and in demand. We offer on-site estate sale services if there is sufficient quantity and quality. We can remove contents and sell them via our array of proprietary resources, again, if they are in demand and of value. And, lastly we can remove and dispose of unwanted and unsaleable contents.

For more insights, tips and videos please visit our Resource Page in the About us tab.

We offer 6 primary services to help families or executors. They are:

Additional info can be found on this brief 90 second video or a full array of great tips and insights and video by clicking on our resource page.For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with EveryHome Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.

Home Selling Tips for Pet Owners

Home Selling Tips for Pet Owners

If you are selling your home it is very important that you understand how important it is to make your home pet neutral.

Bucks County Home Downsizing

Home Selling Tips PA NJIf Home selling tips for pet owners: Removing signs of pets can help a home sell faster and for more money

News flash…although you may love your pet and feel that it’s a part of the family, not everyone may feel the same way, especially prospective home buyers who may be turned off by pet odors, worn yards and scratches on floors and walls. So, what is a home seller with pets to do?

We are sharing insights to pet owners who are trying to sell your home. In fact, we advise animal-owning sellers to rid their home of any evidence of pet damage or animal scents before opening their doors to potential buyers.

Appealing to buyers who may not love pets as much as you do can boost your chances of getting top dollar for your house.

This is part of our 2021 best in class continuing series of articles by Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers, who service Pennsylvania and New Jersey and specialize in real estate, property management, home content downsizing and estate sale services.

Addressing Outside Pet Needs
While a spacious backyard is a plus in the eyes of most buyers, pet-related landmines and holes typically aren’t on a buyer’s list of wants. To get your yard visitor-ready, we recommend filling in any doggy-dug holes and scooping the poop.

Additionally, be sure to check your fencing, deck, and porch for any marks from scratching or chewing. Most pet-related scratches and damage can be easily repaired with a little sandpaper and stain.

Addressing Inside Pet Needs
First impressions are everything, but dog toys and pet odors don’t exactly enhance a home’s initial appeal. Get your home ready by ousting any evidence of pets, including:
• Pet belongings. Collect toys, bowls, beds, crates, cat trees, and litter boxes and keep them out of sight. We even recommend hiding pet photos.
 Scents. Get rid of potentially off-putting animal scents by lighting candles, opening windows, or hiring a professional carpet cleaning crew to deodorize your domicile.
• Scratches. If your hardwood floors have a few battle scars to show for their years of being trodden upon by pets, consider having them resurfaced.
• Remove Your Pet(s). Leaving your pet in the house during showings isn’t the best idea. They could dart out an open door or pose a liability issue if they behave in a less-than-friendly manner toward strangers. If you can’t take your pets with you, let a friend or relative care for them or board them at a kennel.

Please remember that you only have one time to make a good first impression, be that a buyer or with other realtors, so please keep this in mind if you are a home seller with pets. You do not want to sabotage your chances of success by not being mindful of other people’s opinions of pets.

More information can be found on who we are and look through the eyes of the buyer via these brief video links.

For more insights, tips and videos please visit our Resource Page in the About us tab.

We offer 6 primary services to help families or executors. They are:

Additional info can be found on this brief 90 second video or a full array of great tips and insights and video by clicking on our resource page.For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with EveryHome Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.

Downsizing? Where do you begin?

How to Begin Downsizing Your Home

4 Quick Tips

Home Staging Tips PA NJThe vast majority of the clients who contact us are simply overwhelmed trying to tackle downsizing their home or the home of a loved one. It is physically and mentally draining. Often it entails going through possessions that have been in the house for 40 plus years. Where do you begin?

This is part of our 2021 best in class continuing series of articles and helpful tips and insights into helping you move forward and sell your home and clean out your contents by Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers. Personal Property Managers specializes in real estate sales and marketing, home downsizing, content clean out and removal and estate sales, and services Pennsylvania and New Jersey. These tips and insights are especially important and true in the environment we are in today, with the global economy turned upside down, massive job losses, and the need for extreme social distancing due to the Corona Virus, which causes the COVID-19 disease.

Moving from your home of 20, 30 or 40 years is a daunting task. Often our client tell us it’s an “oh my gosh moment” – where do I begin? This is where we can help you.

Did you know that downsizing and moving ranks as one of lifes most difficult events, along with loss of a spouse, divorce and job change. People feel overwhelmed, and wonder; where do they even start?

At Personal Property Managers, we understand the emotional toll downsizing and moving can take on our clients and their families. If you are moving from your home of many years into a senior care community or just relocating, our goal is to help you transition seamlessly to this exciting new chapter in life.

Nick Santoro says that of the many challenges of moving, downsizing is the most difficult. Nick says the reason for this is that you have to make decisions about every personal possession in your home. Personal Property Managers is at your side helping you every step of the way.

Santoro suggests viewing downsizing as a process. We suggest that you start with small goals, and plan on sorting for just a few hours at a time.

  1. Sorting through the easiest and obvious first. Choose a room where what needs to go or stay is the most obvious – like your bedroom or a room that’s rarely used.
  2. Using colored stickers, labels or Post-It notes to identify where items will go. More efficient than writing out a list, movers and family members can use the stickers as guidance on moving day.
  3. Assessing practicality and sentimentality. Items that are both practical and sentimental should move with you. Items that are neither should be left for family, sale or charity.
  4. Eliminating duplicate items or items that are the wrong size. Chances are, you only need three sets of towels, not six. If clothing does not fit, do not bring it with you.

Before the move, Santoro recommends creating a floor plan and determining the practicality of existing furniture. Nick says, do not go out and buy new furniture. Instead, be open to using furniture in new ways.”

Taking measurements of available space is also important. Virginia, a recent client said, “We had large paintings that we really loved, but did not think we could bring with us. Nick had our floor plan and measurements and said, “Oh, yes we can. I know just where those paintings can go!’”

“It’s the sentimental items that make a house a home,” Nick reminds our clients. “Those are just as important as packing up your sensible shoes and kitchenware.”

What about selling some of your home contents?

As you approach the downsizing process, many of our clients contact us about wanting to sell their household items.

Most of the people who call, begin by telling us they have a variety of items ranging from kitchen sets, living room sets, bedroom sets, china cabinets filled with all kinds of things and believe that buyers will want to flock to their home for a chance to buy their contents.
Let’s face it, we all think the things that we have accumulated over the years are beautiful and everyone will them…right? Wrong.

So in this day and age of the Corona Virus, you have to ask yourself would you want to go to a strangers home and buy pre-owned furniture? Probably not. Then on top of that, what most sellers never think of is the logistics and cost of simply moving an item from a seller’s home to a buyer’s home? Who pays for that? This has to be factored into the selling price, if there is even a demand or interest in today’s environment.So, does this mean you cannot sell your pre-owned home contents? No. Absolutely not. You may be able to sell your older unwanted items, but understand that today’s buyers tend to want more updated and contemporary items reflective of today’s styles. Additionally, todays home owners tend to want a more simplified look and feel and not want many items that were popular years ago. So be realistic.

For more insights, tips and videos please visit our Resource Page in the About us tab.

We offer 6 primary services to help families or executors. They are:

Additional info can be found on this brief 90 second video or a full array of great tips and insights and video by clicking on our resource page.For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with EveryHome Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.

Insights, Challenges and Tips on working with Aging Parents

How to Work with Your Aging Parents – 5 Insights

Dealing with challenges involved with our aging parents.

Helping Seniors Move in PA NJOf all the fine lines we have to walk in our lifetime, one of the most challenging, yet most important, is how we deal with the challenges that inevitably crop up when working with our aging parents.

Everyone’s circumstances and family dynamics are different, of course, but there are certain commonalities. Chief among them is how to provide help, support and comfort while respecting our parents’ intellect and abilities. Even as the roles shift, they’re still our parents, and no matter how wise or experienced we are, to them, we’ll always be “the kids.” These tips and insights are especially important and true in the environment we are in today, with the global economy turned upside down, massive job losses, and the need for extreme social distancing due to the Corona Virus, which causes the COVID-19 disease.

We specialize in working with families and adult children who are managing the transition of thier elderly parents. We have learned a thing or two over the years and wanted to share these insights with you. We have put together list of the top 5 tips you may want to consider when working with your agents parents. These helpful tips are part of our 2021 best in class continuing series of articles by Nick and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers. Personal Property Managers specializes in real estate sales, real estate transition services, property management and content clean-out services in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

As our parents age and need more and more help, it’s natural to want to lend a hand, but when you get involved, you need to make sure that you don’t become domineering.

Seniors who feel like their children are trying to take over their lives get resentful and angry – and as a result often disregard their help just to spite them or assert their independence.

This is why it’s important that as our parents age and do start to lose some of their abilities, we stay aware of how we’re communicating with them. Nothing presses our buttons more than family.

While this kind of behavior feels most inappropriate with our parents, being respectful and mindful of boundaries are actually the cornerstones of all healthy relationships.

Stepping Up vs. Overstepping Boundaries

So where exactly is the line between being “helpful” and turning into a bully? Sometimes when you do what you feel is needed – arrange a doctor appointment, suggest grab bars – your parents will resent your good advice. People have a fierce desire to remain independent, often even though they really do need assistance.

Add to that the difficulty of accepting the shifting reality of who is now caring for whom. This can be more difficult for our parents to accept because they often view it as “losing power” to their children.

A big part of striking the right balance has to do with how we speak and act. It’s imperative that we show respect, not attempt to force our will, and to make everything a negotiation (or at least offer options).

5 Things Adult Children and Parents Fight About

It boils down to this, if you think your parents can do something by themselves, let them. But if they – or someone else – could be harmed, don’t feel guilty about getting involved. Most seniors who are slipping a bit are lucid enough to recognize their new limitations. they’re looking for someone they trust to make things easier for them.

Here are five of the big issues that are likely to come up, plus suggestions for avoiding conflict.

1. Driving

Nothing gives people a greater sense of independence than driving. A car gets them where they want to go when they want to go. Yet in the hands of someone with physical or cognitive limitations, an automobile can become a lethal weapon.

One must be extremely sensitive when you come to the point where you insist that your parent hand over the keys. Consider trying initially to negotiate ways they can drive their car less frequently – perhaps only locally and in the daylight. Elderly people who have become nervous drivers and don’t feel they have to put up a fight often discover they actually prefer not being in the driver’s seat.

2. Finances

This is a very sensitive subject and is often met with great resistance. Unfortunatley there are many stories of financial abuse of our elderly loved ones.

The best way to approach this is to suggest that our elderly loved ones open their checkbooks and show us their credit card statements and all their bills. But if they’re unwilling and you try to force the issue, they might accuse you of meddling. When there’s no evidence of a problem, it’s better to just offer help – like balancing a checkbook. Keep your antennae up for hints of trouble.

If you suspect they are mismanaging their resources and they resist your involvement, tell them you need to call in a social worker. It might be easier for your parents to listen to a neutral third party, and a trained professional might have communication or coping strategies that you don’t.

3. Home Safety

People can be slow to accept their physical limitations. If they’ve always gotten in and out of the shower OK, why worry now? The answer is that we all have a problem projecting in the future, yet for people over 65, falls are the leading cause of injury and death. When a parent is having problems with gait or limb strength or has recently started using a walker or cane, it’s time to start the conversation.

So how should you handle this? Often scare tactics go a long way. The image of lying alone, in grave pain, injured (or possibly dying) alone in the living room might be enough to “put the fear of God” into a parent who perfers not to discuss such issues. Often times elderly loved ones wouldn’t wear their life-alert pendant until they hear about someone who fell and waited several hours for the ambulance to arrive.

Most people will accept minor fixes, like rug tape or bathtub no-slip strips, so if you start with the little things (and build up to the larger ones), you won’t come off as oppressive.

4. Doctors, Treatments and Medication

Seniors are not always forthcoming about their medical reports. Sometimes they haven’t completely understood what a doctor has said, or they could be deliberately withholding information they think will make them seem enfeebled or cause you to worry.

If your parent seems healthy you may want to consider backing off (but keep a watchful eye). If, however, you observe any symptoms or notice your parent is missing doctor appointments, getting confused with his medications and won’t let you help, call in a social worker or nurse. Tell your parent you are doing so. In a life-or-death matter, there’s no such thing as a bossy pants.

5. End-of-Life Planning

No one likes to think about this heaviest of all topics – and yet if people want their wishes heeded, important documents need to be in place: a power of attorney, a last will and testament, a living will, organ donation papers, funeral preferences and more.

How to handle You cannot force your parents to do any of these things or tell you where they keep the safety deposit box key.

For more insights, tips and videos please visit our Resource Page in the About us tab.

We offer 6 primary services to help families or executors. They are:

Additional info can be found on this brief 90 second video or a full array of great tips and insights and video by clicking on our resource page.For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with EveryHome Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.

Should you accept a buyer offer for your home?

Should you accept the buyer offer on your home?

Property Manager PA NJ

Great news! You have a contract on your house. Do you take it?

So…your house is on the market. You’re ready to sell. You have done your homework. You have decluttered it and cleaned it up. You have staged it and had great pictures taken. Now it’s show time. More good news. You just received your first signed offer to buy your house. You’re thrilled. Right? So, what’s the problem? Should you take it?

This is part of our on-going 2021 best-in-class series of real estate articles by Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers who service Pennsylvania and New Jersey and specialize in buying and selling homes, the real estate industry, home content downsizing, property management and estate sales. These tips and insights are especially important and true in the environment we are in today, with the global economy turned upside down, massive job losses, and the need for extreme social distancing due to the Corona Virus, which causes the COVID-19 disease.

Naturally, if you have received an all cash, as is, quick close, full price offer, you should jump on it. But, as we all know this rarely happens. In this brief article, we’ll share with you some things to consider when a buyer makes an offer on your home.

After the initial excitement of receiving a written offer, home sellers need to take a close look at the details. We are talking about looking beyond just the offer price.

Nick Santoro says, “You should look at every offer the same way, whether you have one offer or multiple offers.” Nick points out that anyone can write anything in a contract, so it’s up to your listing agent to check out whether the buyer is truly qualified.

Sellers automatically look first at the purchase price. Nick shares that other factors should have equal weight. Financing is an important consideration.

“A lender letter should be attached to every offer, so your agent can contact that lender and ask about the buyer’s qualifications,” Santoro says.

A home sellers listing agents will want to know if the loan is fully documented; if the lender foresees any credit problems and if the buyer’s cash is in the bank. Joe Santoro recommends requesting a document called a BFI or buyers financial statement, which includes income, debt and assets, including the cash needed for the purchase.

Nick suggests that you compare the mortgage preapproval letter and the buyer purchase offer to make sure the buyers are fully approved to borrow as much as they need.

Joe Santoro, co-founder of Personal Property Managers points out that virtually all buyer offers include contingencies on the buyer’s financing, home inspection and appraisal. Joe points out that the more contingencies there are, the more opportunities there are for the buyers to walk away.

Here are four Buyer and Seller contingencies that should be reviewed carefully:

Buyer Financing. The financing contingency should be 21 days or less, If someone makes a full-price offer but they need 60 days to tie up their financing, they’re asking you to take your home off the market while they figure out how to buy it.

Buyer Home inspection. The home inspection contingency should take place in 7 to 10 days at most. A seller can choose to sell their house “as is” and agree to an inspection that allows the buyer to walk away if they don’t like the report but doesn’t allow negotiations for repairs. Buyers who bid up the price on a house sometimes try to use the inspection as a way to lower it back down by having the seller subtract the cost of repairs from the price. Joe Santoro points out that often times, a buyer home inspection, done by a third party is often where a deal breaks down. Every seller thinks their house is perfect and nothing needs to be done to it, and certainly does not want to pay for any repairs as they are leaving anyway. Conversely, every buyer wants to buy a house that they feel is perfect and wants all home inspection issues addressed in fully. This is not always possible or particle. If you have never sold a house before, a buyer home inspection report often is about 40 pages in length and can scare away both buyers and seller. It is not meant to be this way, but is often taken as an insult. Diplomacy and negotiations are the key here.

Buyer lender appraisal. The appraisal contingency should be 21 days or less, An agreement of sale can be fully accepted by both buyer and seller but it can fall apart if the buyers lender when conducting a market analysis and appraisal feels that the house is worth less than it may be listed for and agreed upon. No bank or lender will lend mortgage money on a property that is valued less than the home purchase price. We recommend making sure the buyer has enough cash to bring extra money to closing if the appraisal comes in low. Otherwise, the seller would have to reduce the price or split the difference with the buyer.

Settlement date. Typically, closing is set for 30 to 45 days after the contract is accepted. If a buyer asks for a longer term, it could be that they are not financially ready. A longer settlement gives the buyer more time to back out, which could force the seller to put their home back on the market. If the seller is moving into a new house, the settlement date is crucial. A seller doesn’t want to be caught between two houses with furnishings in storage or paying two mortgages at once.

A substantial deposit shows the buyer’s desire for your home, while a small deposit makes it easier for them to walk away. It also may signal that they have very little cash and that they’re stretching to buy the house.

Some sellers are so relieved to receive an offer that they say yes to the first one they get. That’s not necessarily bad, depending on the market.

Some sellers are afraid they won’t get another offer, but if it’s the first weekend on the market, they may want to wait a few days.

For multiple offers, such as is the case in todays market, compare prices and terms to determine which one makes the most sense for your situation. Your agent will negotiate with the buyer’s agent, but you decide what to haggle over.

“It’s always best to negotiate on the least amount of details,” Joe says.

Nick says that if the price is lower than you want, we recommend that your agent go back to the buyer’s agent with a comparative market analysis (CMA) and specifics about your home to show why it’s priced as it is.

“Sometimes sellers think they need a perfect offer and won’t accept one if it’s slightly under the asking price,” Santoro says.

Nick said that he has had sellers who refused to accept an offer very close and or just under list price, only to have it sit on the market for a much longer time than anticipated, only to have an anxious seller panic and accept less money. Time is money as taxes, insurance and utility bills keep mounting. All these things need to be factored into the decision to accept or decline all reasonable offers.

“It’s possible to end up with nothing if a seller gets too greedy,” says Santoro. “If you have a willing and able buyer who can afford to buy your house and is within reason of your listing price, you should try to make it work. If you don’t, you could end up with a lower offer later.”

So all buyer offers are dependent upon many factors as noted above. In addition, there are many factors to consider on the seller side too. Factors such as how long the house is on the market. The amount of work that will need to be done to the house. Market comps. Whether or not the seller is carrying two mortgages or not; their new house and the one they are trying to sell. All of these factors must be considered when making your decision to accept a buyer offer or not.

More information can be found on who we are and Understanding market Comps via these brief video links

Personal Property Managers, can take care of all your home selling needs along with downsizing, content liquidation and renovation work. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all. For more insights, tips and videos please visit our Resource Page in the About us tab.

We offer 6 primary services to help families or executors. They are:

Additional info can be found on this brief 90 second video or a full array of great tips and insights and video by clicking on our resource page.For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with EveryHome Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.

2021 Housing Market – Facts, Forecasts and Tips

We wanted to share some insights with you regarding the housing market as we enter 2021, and give you a good feel for where the market is heading. Based on this information, we also will share with you some tips and insights if you are a buyer or a seller in todays housing market.

First and foremost, we want to give thanks to the brave men and women who are out on the front line; our first responders, healthcare workers, medical personnel and support providers. Secondly, we ask all to continue to practice safety and social distancing during this national emergency.

This is part of an on-going series of real estate articles by Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers ( www.personalpropertymanagers.com ) who service Pennsylvania and New Jersey and specialize in real estate, home content downsizing, senior transition services, property management and estate sales.

So, let’s take a quick look at the facts:

  • By all measures the housing market is exploding.
  • There is more demand than there is inventory.
  • Houses are selling well over list price and are selling much faster than in the past.
  • In fact, house prices are up 12% full year 2020 vs 2019.
  • Houses sold 40% faster in 2020 than in 2019. So, the availability for a buyer to preview a house is much shorter as is days on market with many homes going under contract within the first two days, with multiple offer and many above asking price.
  • Mortgage rates are at historic lows, with current rates under 3%
  • With the advent of more people working remote and working from home there is an exodus from the city to the suburbs where there is more space when working from home.

So, now that we have shared the current trends, where are we heading in 2021 and what you may wish to do if you are a buyer or a seller in todays housing market

Here is our list of 6 predictions for the housing market in 2021. They are:

Economic Recovery

  • The combination of several viable COVID-19 vaccines and the promise of an economic recovery suggests the strong housing trends that emerged in 2020 will continue in 2021.
  • However, tight supply and strong housing prices present affordability challenges, so homebuyers may confront a slightly different landscape in the months ahead.

Housing supply will be tight despite new construction

  • As we enter 2021, homebuyers can anticipate a continuation of tight housing inventories. The uncertainty associated with the pandemic has stalled some new home construction. The U.S. Census Bureau found housing starts in the latter part of 2020 to be almost 13% above 2019. New home construction has not been sufficient for the rising housing demand. However, if signs of a strong economic recovery emerge, inventory may start to normalize in the latter part of 2021. Builders could resume previously delayed projects. In addition, slowly increasing mortgage rates and rising home prices may curtail some of the demand.

Home sales growth will be higher than last year

  • According to many industry experts annual home sales growth will be the highest in 40 years in the United States at an estimated 21.9%.
  • The pool of potential homebuyers has increased, in part due to the pandemic. In particular, millennials are looking for first homes or trading up in housing size due to their desire to leave the major cities and find space for growing families.
  • A recent survey from Realtor.com shows those who think it’s a ‘good time to sell’ now outnumber those who think it’s a ‘bad time to sell’, 48% to 44%, respectively, for the first time since the pandemic started, any additional housing inventory that has come to market has yet to dampen prices.

Rising mortgage rates may temper housing demand

  • Economists foresee the record low mortgage rates of 2020 slowly increasing. According to Realtor.com, mortgage rates will be closer to 3.4% by the end of this year. The 30-year fixed mortgage rate currently hovers around 2.875%, so the expected increase is almost half a point. Therefore, rising mortgage rates may impact the number of people able to afford homeownership, but mortgage interest rates are still extremely attractive and at or near historic lows. Some researchers argue that demand for new homes will stay healthy for the foreseeable future as buyers weigh the financial burden of renting versus purchasing, especially in major cities. Then on top of this you’ll need to factor in more and more people working remotely from home, which will further impact the demand for suburban housing.

Residents will continue to leave major cities for the suburbs

  • With many companies announcing a shift to flexible working arrangements, people are relocating outside of many major cities, such as New York, Philadelphia, Washington and Chicago. Where there was once a shortage of rental units in these major cities, now there are thousands of vacant units.
  • Low mortgage rates and the shift to remote work from home has accelerated the suburban migration because families have the flexibility to move. As a result, high-tax cities will see their tax revenues decrease substantially, forcing city services to be cut dramatically as people migrate to areas with lower living costs.

Remote work will drive the demand for more space

  • Just as in all major events we have faced, short terms shift in our daily lives now become the new norm. After vaccines have been rolled out to the masses and we transition back to what life was like prior to the pandemic, many things will remain in this new norm. We’ll see shortened in-person work weeks, more digital collaborations, and hybrid learning environments.  New homebuyers are looking for houses that support work and learning from home. Larger families, as is the case in Europe, may reconfigure themselves so more generations can coexist in the same space. Kids will continuously adapt their learning environments to hybrid or remote learning models. More time in and around the home means homebuyers will look for features like home offices, multi-purpose living spaces, spacious backyards, and walkable communities.

We hope that the facts that we shared with you give you insight into what is happening in the housing market and where it’s headed. We would like to conclude by sharing some insights if you are considering selling your home, and how to take advantage of recent trends, and we would like to also share some thoughts with you if you are considering buying a home. They are:

Tips for home Sellers:

  • Virtual tours and home videos are an absolute must for today’s buyer who want to preview a property before going outside or even considering it
  • Clean, clean, clean and then declutter your home. This is especially important now as more and more people are viewing homes in advance via videos, so clean out countertops, closets, garages and rooms in general is very important. You want to give an impression of largeness, cleanliness, and openness
  • Take advantage of your down time to spruce up your house. Do the simple things that make a big difference like a fresh coat of paint, sprucing up the front entrance to your home, trim the lawn and shrubs and make your house as inviting as possible. Remember that buyer money may be tight so you will want to do as much as you can so that a buyer will little to do when moving into your house which saves them time and money and makes your house more attractive. For more information, please see our link on the profile of todays buyers and sellers.
  • Price your home to sell. With this being a buyers’market and credit tight, properly pricing your home is critical. Work with your Realtor to do a detailed comparative market analysis to help you. Sellers will need to factor in that amount of work that may be needed on their house to bring it up to todays buyer trends and price their home accordingly. In other words if a sellers house may need a new kitchen because it is dated, that could cost between $20,000 and $75,000. A bathroom could cost between $5,000 to $25,000. So if you are looking at some online sites that offer a rough ball park for your home valuation, a seller really needs to dig much deeper to determine a homes true value. More info can be found in our article on the importance of a comparative market analysis.
  • Vacant homes are more desirable for buyers today, because the risk of germs is greatly reduced
  • Neutral colors. 98% of buyers today want neutral color as opposed to bold colors. Remove wallpaper and boarders. 79% of buyers prefer the light gray colors that are so popular today

Buyer insights:

  • Make sure that you are pre-approved for a mortgage before house shopping
  • Mortgage interest rates are very low and near historically low levels.
  • Deals. There are plenty of deals out there for eager home sellers, so take advantage of this if you are pre-qualified

For more insights, tips and videos please visit our Resource Page in the About us tab.
We offer 6 primary services to help families or executors. They are:

Additional info can be found on this brief 90 second video or a full array of great tips and insights and video by clicking on our resource page.For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with EveryHome Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.

Are you an Empty Nester? Now what?

Empty Nest – Home Downsizing, Cleanout and Real Estate Services

Are you an empty nester? Have you lived in your home for years? Are your kids now grown and out of the house? Are you looking to simplify your life and feel you no longer need that big house? Do you have lots of stuff that you have accumulated over the years and no longer have a need for it, and do not know what to do with it? Would you like to sell your home and move into a smaller home or an active adult community? Do you feel overwhelmed and do not know where to begin? No problem. We can help. We are empty nester home downsizing and full service real estate specialists servicing Pennsylvania and New Jersey. We provide you with a one-stop solution. Our single source solution provides you with total peace of mind. We know the process of downsizing, moving, selling and buying a new home is physically and mentally exhausting. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all. We handle all your home and property content downsizing, de-cluttering, content liquidation and real estate sale needs. Our goal is to help you declutter and downsize to obtain the highest value of your home. We provide special 2020 best-in-class portfolio of services to assist you.

During this challenging time in the Corona Virus and COVID-19 era, we help families that are unable travel or tend to their property needs by providing a true one-stop resource. We are focused on making life just a little easier for families during often difficult times. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all.  

We service Pennsylvania, and the counties of Bucks, Montgomery, Philadelphia, Delaware, Chester and the Main Line. In New Jersey, we service the counties of Hunterdon, Mercer, Monmouth, Morris, Burlington, Middlesex, Union, Ocean, Essex and Somerset.

We offer 6 primary services to help families or executors. They are:

Additional info can be found on this brief 90 second video or a full array of great tips and insights and video by clicking on our resource page.

We also offer discount real estate services via our association with EveryHome Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.

Bucks County Home Downsizing
Bucks County Home Downsizing Services

Home Downsizing Services

How Our Process Works

We begin by meeting with you personally. This allows us to understand your personal needs and for us to develop a tailored solution to meet your individual goals as you transition to an empty nester. We offer extreme cleaning and extreme home cleanout services, removing contents from hoarder homes to multi-million dollar homes.

As certified Senior Real Estate Specialist, we then conduct a comprehensive market analysis, which will help give you a feel for the value of your home, your contents and their value. We then will evaluate the contents of the property with you to ascertain what you wish to keep, give to friends and family, donate, shed, discard or move to your new home. A full inventory is done at this time and is sorted based on your direction to us. This allows us to begin the home cleanout and staging for you.

For items of value, we can facilitate an Estate Sale or help remove contents and liquidate them.

For items you wish to part with, we will arrange for the disposal of them or donate them to charitable organizations. For items you wish to keep, we can arrange for them to be packed and moved. We then work with you to determine a moving schedule.

We can assist in creating a floor plan for items going into your new home and help you move, unpack and organize. Lastly, we can assist in a final cleaning of your property as part of our home downsizing and de-cluttering process, which is all geared to help you sell your property at the maximum value.Estate Sale Services New Jersey (NJ)

Estate Sale and Content Liquidation Services

In addition to our home cleanout services and downsizing, we can help sell and liquidate all your household contents via an Estate Sale if your contents warrant it. Together we develop realistic fair market value price points for all household contents. We even develop special website pages to market your contents.

As your asset liquidator, we have found that prospective buyers feel that there is a greater perceived value when a professional estate liquidation firm conducts your household estate sale.

Please note that the market for pre-owned items is entirely based upon the style, age and condition of your contents. As a result, not all things are saleable. Additionally, there will always be two different sets of values to any items. There is the seller’s perceived value, which may have a high emotional and sentimental value, and then there is the potential buyer’s view of the contents value, which is generally very different. Please remember that something is only worth what someone else is willing to pay for it. To learn more, please click here to view a short article we wrote on this subject or click on our Resource link page for a host of other insights into selling pre-owned items, home downsizing, home sales information and elder care.

For more information on our estate sale process, please click here.Estate Sale Services Pennsylvania (PA)

Why Choose Personal Property Managers

We are an award winning organization dedicated to providing personalized services and offering you solutions that are tailored to your specific needs. For more insights, tips and videos please visit our Resource Page in the About us tab.

We tend to your property and its contents like it was our own. We know that often times a move, a home downsizing or sale can be overwhelming and physically demanding. We can handle everything for you. When you call us, you get us. We are on site at every job. You can rely on us and trust us. With Personal Property Managers…one call does it all. We are Estate Specialists, are licensed Realtors in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and are certified Senior Real Estate Specialist via EveryHome Realty, RS308044 and 1326862. Please call us for a free consultation at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909.

Working from home? Create more balance

Tips for Balancing Working from Home

Personal Property ManagersThe world has changed in so many ways since the pandemic and COVID-19 outbreak. Personal and professional lives have been impacted in ways that were unimaginable just a few short months ago. Many of us are now working from home, and with that comes a whole new set of challenges. We wanted to share some tips and insights that we have learned in managing the delicate balance of working from home while juggling family and social needs.

This is part of an on-going series of articles by Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers ( www.personalpropertymanagers.com ) who service Pennsylvania and New Jersey and specialize in real estate, home content downsizing, senior transition services, property management and estate sales, but we mainly work with families to assist them during times of transition.

Working from home can blur the lines between your personal and professional life. For those of you who are now working from home, we are sure that you have experience the challenges of being on a work call or zoom video meeting and having the dog barking in the background or the baby crying or the TV blasting in the next room. Additionally, it’s often difficult to stop working at the end of the day. So where do you draw the line? This imbalance can lead to elevated stress levels and unhealthy habits, not to mention social and family isolation.

So here is a list of tips that we have found to help give you some balance and peace while working from home:

  • Declutter and organize your home so you’re not distracted by any mess when trying to focus on work.
  • Set some ground rules for family members and let them know that when you are home working that being interrupted is not OK; that you are working and will be happy to be with them after your work is done.
  • Loneliness, disconnect, and isolation are common problems in remote work life, especially for extroverts. Stay as connected as possible with friends and family with simple phone calls, walks in the park, Facetime or Zoom virtual contact. Remember we are all in this together. Let’s support one another.
  • Don’t eat where you work. This not only keeps your workspace clean but also sets a boundary between the places where you work and relax.
  • Break the monotony of working from home and do some stuff differently
  • Don’t share your workspace with others in your household. Each person should have a dedicated workspace. Ideally, in different rooms.
  • Create structures in your day that prioritize your wellness. Don’t forget to get up and move and exercise.
  • Stick to morning routine you had in normal times as much as possible. Make your bed, shower, go out and grab a cup of coffee, change out of sweatpants.
  • Plan healthy meals for the week so you’re not snacking and frequently just because you’re steps away from your kitchen
  • Set alarms on your phone or your smart watch to remind yourself to stand up and stretch, take a lunch break, or go outside for a walk
  • Keep your business-related materials in a dedicated workspace
  • Save housework for dedicated time outside of working hours
  • Set a firm time to stop working and create a to do list for the next day. This will help you avoid working long into the night
  • We know it’s difficult to go out to a restaurant or bar or even be with extended family and friends, so try planning some virtual social time. Try Zoom video calls or Facetime calls to friends and family. Stay connected even if you cannot do it in person.
  • Avoid electronics after your work is done for the day.  Don’t get stuck into the habit of watching TV all night after working on the computer all day. Get up, get out and move.
  • Try to go to bed at the same time every night. Before falling asleep, listen to soothing music or use a mediation app instead of scrolling through your phone.
  • Exercise. Exercise. Exercise. This can take shape in many forms like biking or simply walking but do it; do something to get the blood flowing and relieve pressure and stress of being cooped up in the house. It can also be a good family thing to do.

Family and safety is of utmost importance today more than ever. So if you are thinking about moving, downsizing or are the administrator of a family estate and need help during this transition, give us a call. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all.

We offer 6 primary services to help families or executors. They are:

Additional info can be found on this brief 90 second video or a full array of great tips and insights and video by clicking on our resource page.

For more insights, tips and videos please visit our Resource Page in the About us tab.For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with EveryHome Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.

Empty Nest – Home Downsizing

Empty Nest – Home Downsizing, Cleanout and Real Estate Services

Are you an empty nester? Have you lived in your home for years? Are your kids now grown and out of the house? Are you looking to simplify your life and feel you no longer need that big house? Do you have lots of stuff that you have accumulated over the years and no longer have a need for it, and do not know what to do with it? Would you like to sell your home and move into a smaller home or an active adult community? Do you feel overwhelmed and do not know where to begin? No problem. We can help. We are empty nester home downsizing and full service real estate specialists servicing Pennsylvania and New Jersey. We provide you with a one-stop solution. Our single source solution provides you with total peace of mind. We know the process of downsizing, moving, selling and buying a new home is physically and mentally exhausting. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all. We handle all your home and property content downsizing, de-cluttering, content liquidation and real estate sale needs. Our goal is to help you declutter and downsize to obtain the highest value of your home. We provide special 2020 best-in-class portfolio of services to assist you.

During this challenging time in the Corona Virus and COVID-19 era, we help families that are unable travel or tend to their property needs by providing a true one-stop resource. We are focused on making life just a little easier for families during often difficult times. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all.  

We service Pennsylvania, and the counties of Bucks, Montgomery, Philadelphia, Delaware, Chester and the Main Line. In New Jersey, we service the counties of Hunterdon, Mercer, Monmouth, Morris, Burlington, Middlesex, Union, Ocean, Essex and Somerset.

We offer 6 primary services to help families or executors. They are:

Additional info can be found on this brief 90 second video or a full array of great tips and insights and video by clicking on our resource page.

We also offer discount real estate services via our association with EveryHome Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.

Bucks County Home Downsizing

Home Downsizing Services

How Our Process Works

We begin by meeting with you personally. This allows us to understand your personal needs and for us to develop a tailored solution to meet your individual goals as you transition to an empty nester. We offer extreme cleaning and extreme home cleanout services, removing contents from hoarder homes to multi-million dollar homes.

As certified Senior Real Estate Specialist, we then conduct a comprehensive market analysis, which will help give you a feel for the value of your home, your contents and their value. We then will evaluate the contents of the property with you to ascertain what you wish to keep, give to friends and family, donate, shed, discard or move to your new home. A full inventory is done at this time and is sorted based on your direction to us. This allows us to begin the home cleanout and staging for you.

For items of value, we can facilitate an Estate Sale or help remove contents and liquidate them.

For items you wish to part with, we will arrange for the disposal of them or donate them to charitable organizations. For items you wish to keep, we can arrange for them to be packed and moved. We then work with you to determine a moving schedule.

We can assist in creating a floor plan for items going into your new home and help you move, unpack and organize. Lastly, we can assist in a final cleaning of your property as part of our home downsizing and de-cluttering process, which is all geared to help you sell your property at the maximum value.

Estate Sale and Content Liquidation Services

In addition to our home cleanout services and downsizing, we can help sell and liquidate all your household contents via an Estate Sale if your contents warrant it. Together we develop realistic fair market value price points for all household contents. We even develop special website pages to market your contents.

As your asset liquidator, we have found that prospective buyers feel that there is a greater perceived value when a professional estate liquidation firm conducts your household estate sale.

Please note that the market for pre-owned items is entirely based upon the style, age and condition of your contents. As a result, not all things are saleable. Additionally, there will always be two different sets of values to any items. There is the seller’s perceived value, which may have a high emotional and sentimental value, and then there is the potential buyer’s view of the contents value, which is generally very different. Please remember that something is only worth what someone else is willing to pay for it. To learn more, please click here to view a short article we wrote on this subject or click on our Resource link page for a host of other insights into selling pre-owned items, home downsizing, home sales information and elder care.

For more information on our estate sale process, please click here.Estate Sale Services Pennsylvania (PA)

Why Choose Personal Property Managers

We are an award winning organization dedicated to providing personalized services and offering you solutions that are tailored to your specific needs. For more insights, tips and videos please visit our Resource Page in the About us tab.

We tend to your property and its contents like it was our own. We know that often times a move, a home downsizing or sale can be overwhelming and physically demanding. We can handle everything for you. When you call us, you get us. We are on site at every job. You can rely on us and trust us. With Personal Property Managers…one call does it all. We are Estate Specialists, are licensed Realtors in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and are certified Senior Real Estate Specialist via EveryHome Realty, RS308044 and 1326862. Please call us for a free consultation at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909.

Tips to think about before investing in real estate

Tips to think about before investing in real estate

Property Manager PA NJAre you thinking about investing in real estate? You will want to think carefully about what, where and for how much you want to buy, is now more important than ever. Investing in property is the single biggest financial transaction that you will ever conclude and should always be done with great care. There’s more to consider than you think. For starters, property is an active, rather than a passive investment and comes with financial risk.

Although, buying your own home should first and foremost be about securing your future and creating a foundation upon which to build a life and future for yourself and your family, you should also make sure that you are a making a sound investment. These tips and insights are especially important and true in the environment we are in today, with the global economy turned upside down, massive job losses, and the need for extreme social distancing due to the Corona Virus, which causes the COVID-19 disease. Additionally, during this challenging time in the Corona Virus and COVID-19 era, we help families that are unable travel or tend to their property needs by providing a true one-stop resource. We are focused on making life just a little easier for families during often difficult times. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all.

This is part of a continuing series of articles by Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers, who service Pennsylvania and New Jersey and specialize in real estate, property management, home content downsizing and estate sale services.

Before you begin….Do your homework (top 8 tips)

Whether it is your primary home or a second property such as a rental you should always do your homework thoroughly to mitigate potential risk.

Consider the downside right upfront. When the market turns for example, you might find yourself in a tight financial spot and you have to sell. Think about this when you buy: how hard will it be to sell the property if it comes down to it?

Consider whether you have the time and financial means for this type of investment. If you are purely looking for an investment, then a property fund might be the better choice, especially if you are a novice or first time buyer.

Once you have decided that you are going to take the step and invest in bricks and mortar, be sure to keep these 8 golden rules in mind:

1. Location, location, location – this old adage will always be the primary driver of demand, prices and property values. Research, research, research. Before you sign on the dotted line, chat to local area agents and get the vital statistics and information about the area.

2. Pay a fair price – do not pay more than fair market value unless you are sure that you are financially secure enough to hold onto the property until it starts to accumulate value. Price growth tends to track economic growth quite closely, so if the economy stalls, so do prices.

3. Neighborhood – do a thorough due diligence on the neighborhood and area, especially if you are not familiar with it. Make sure that it is a viable area, more so if you are looking at a second or investment property. Ensure there are good services, roads and communications connectivity for aspects such as internet and satellite television for example

4. Street savvy – don’t stop with the neighborhood, also check out the street (or complex) to ensure you are buying in the right part of the suburb. Be sure to check out the prices in your road (or complex) to compare that you are not paying more. Guard against paying a high price for an overcapitalized home.

5. Facilities and amenities – the better the facilities and amenities in the area, the more in demand the property is likely to be when it comes to either selling or renting it out. A good transport network is important, as are schools and then secondary facilities such as shops and other services.

6. Security – this has become an important consideration for neighborhoods and complexes. The more secure the property and area, the more attractive it is for buyers and tenants. Check out whether there is a neighborhood watch or similar group and ensure that the property itself is adequately secured and insured.

7. Capital value growth and yields – you obviously want to invest in an area where property values grow at least in line with the market average, preferably at an above average rate. If you are investing in a rental, then you will want to check out the rental returns in the area as it is important to budget for any shortfalls. Ensure also that you build fat into your budget for all the hidden costs associated with a rental property.

8. Leisure and attractions – if you are thinking about investing in a holiday rental, then leisure facilities and attractions are important. The closer the property is situated to attractions such as the beach, river or game reserve for example, the more in demand it will be. Consider who your tenants will be and put yourself in their shoes. Where do they want to stay when they book for a holiday for example?

More information can be found on who we are and lessons for home selling experts via these brief video links

We offer 6 primary services to help families or executors. They are:

Additional info can be found on this brief 90 second video or a full array of great tips and insights and video by clicking on our resource page.

For more insights, tips and videos please visit our Resource Page in the About us tab.For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with EveryHome Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.