Tag Archives: staging

Home Staging 101 – Boot Camp – 17

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This podcast will share with you 5 key tips and useful insights for staging your home in preparation for its sale, so that you can sell your home for the highest price and sell it in the shortest time possible. For more information contact Joe Santoro or Nick Santoro of Personal Property Managers at www.personalpropertymanagers.com

Personal Property Managers specializes in: Home Downsizing, Home Cleanout Services, Estate Sales, Home Content Liquidation, Property Management, Absentee Home Watch, Moving, Full Service Discount Real Estate Services, Home Sales, Home Buyer Services, and Elder Care Services. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all.

Home Staging…101. 5 Tips – home staging boot camp

Home Staging boot camp – 5 cheap ways to stage your home for success

We specialize in helping our clients sell their homes for the best possible price and to do so in the shortest period of time. With this in mind, we wanted to share with you 5 quick and inexpensive ways for you stage your home for sale to get the greatest return on your investment. We call this our Personal Property Managers home staging boot camp.

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This is part of a continuing series of helpful articles from Joe Santoro and Nick Santoro of Personal Property Managers to assist you in home downsizing, content liquidation, home staging and full service discount real estate services. Personal Property Managers services clients in New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

If you’re selling your house, it has to look its best so buyers can see its potential and imagine themselves living there. That’s what home-staging is all about. It’s about first impressions, which are lasting. It’s about separating yourself and your home from others on the market, so look, feel, style, organization, cleanliness and decluttering is super important.

A professional home-stager will cost between $50 and $150 per hour, say Nick Santoro.

The good news is that you can get it done for a lot less money. You can do it yourself for the most part and you can have fun doing it. Joe Santoro, co-founder of Personal Property Managers shares his expert tips for staging your home at almost no cost.

1. Remove your personal items
Packing away your personal stuff, such as pictures, sports memorabilia, even religious items, is one of the easiest, cheapest things you can do to stage your house.
“The reason you want to depersonalize your home is because you want buyers to view it as their potential home,” Santoro says.

Prospective buyers may have a hard time envisioning themselves in the house if they’re surrounded by photos of your family. They want to envision their family in your home; not yours.

“Pictures are extremely distracting,” says Nick Santoro, who also recommends removing religious items from view.

Besides attracting a buyer, “you want the buyer’s agent to enjoy showing the home,” Nick says, because even if a particular buyer isn’t interested, the agent might represent someone who would be a good match.

The cost: $2 to $3 for a roll of packing tape. You can pick up free boxes at stores in your neighborhood or go to a big box store and pick up boxes for under $2.00

2. De-Clutter
Decluttering is another simple way to get buyers to focus on the bones of the house. “After years of living in the same home, clutter collects in such a way that may not be evident to the homeowner. However, it does affect the way buyers see the home, even if you do not realize it,” Joe says.

We recommend clearing off kitchen and bathroom countertops. Remove everything you can to give an impression of large space and cleanliness.

If you have kids, get rid of the toys all around the house. For all you know, the buyers could be empty-nesters.

If you cannot remove unwanted items or just want to hold on to what you have, we suggest packing that stuff in boxes and neatly stacking them in a corner of the garage. Anything extra should go in a small storage unit. Even better, ask a friend or relative to stash your items at no charge.

The cost: The price of a storage unit varies (around $75 a month for a 5-by-5-foot unit). You can get back some of that money as a refund on your taxes for any of the decluttered items you donate to charity.

3. Rearrange rooms and give them purpose
Rearrange the rooms in your home and make sure each room has a distinct purpose. You may also want to take a look at builder spec home in your area to get a feel for the look, theme and style of today’s furnished homes.

Builders are experts on preparing their product for prospective buyers.

If your home has been painted recently, you’re ahead of the game. If not, take a paintbrush to the rooms that need it most. Sellers who paint the interior of their home will see a large return on the investment. There is no substitution for a clean, well-organized and freshly painted home.

The cost: Anywhere from $16 to $50 per gallon for paint, plus an additional $10 to $50 for other painting supplies (primer, brushes, drop cloths, etc.).

4. Clean and deodorize
No one wants to visit a dirty house, especially prospective buyers. So make sure your house is squeaky clean.

‘When buyers see an unkempt home or smell something when they first walk in, they become turned off immediately,” Nick says. “They can rarely see past it to look at all of the great features in the home.”

For a fist time, long time heavy cleaning job, we suggest having the house professionally cleaned so that everything is spotless: windows, sliding glass door tracks, garage, basement, ceiling fans, etc.

If you have having an open house, we also recommend baking cookies in the oven, bringing cinnamon sticks to a slow boil in a pot of water or using air freshener before each showing. Above all, please remember to remove any pet litter boxes or food bowls. Not everyone is a pet lover.

The cost: Varies by the location and size of the home, but expect to spend at least $100-$250 to clean a four-bedroom, 2,500-square-foot home.

5. Enhance curb appeal
Don’t overlook the home’s exterior when you’re selling.

“Curb appeal is just as important as cleaning the inside of the home,” Nick says. “It’s the buyer’s first impression of your home.” Mow the lawn, make sure the sidewalk and driveway are free of clutter and debris, and make sure the house number is easy to see. You may need to pressure-clean your driveway and sidewalk.
Another valuable low-cost solution? Mulch. “It makes everything look trim and neat,” Joe says.

Please remember that first impressions are lasting impressions. Joe Santoro, shared that on a number of occasions, when taking clients to look at home, he has had clients pull up to a house and just refuse to get out of the car because the home was not well kept from the outside. He has experienced a similar negative reaction when buyers entered the house and it appeared to be too cluttered giving it a much smaller impression. This turns off buyers and they simply walk away. Simple things like this make all the difference in the world.

The cost: Mulch costs about $3 per bag. You may be able to rent a pressure washer at Home Depot or your local hardware store for $35 per day or more. It will cost you a lot more than that to buy one. Hiring a professional to pressure-clean a 2,500-square-foot-house may set you back about $300.

Personal Property Managers, can take care of all your home selling needs along with downsizing, content liquidation and renovation work. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all. For more insights, tips and videos please visit our Resource Page in the About us tab.

For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with EveryHome Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.

Staging your home to appeal to Millennial buyers – 14

staging for millennials

This podcast will share 8 useful tips and steps that you can use to successfully stage your home to appeal to millennial buyers. For more information contact Joe Santoro or Nick Santoro of Personal Property Managers at www.personalpropertymanagers.com

Personal Property Managers specializes in: Home Downsizing, Home Cleanout Services, Estate Sales, Home Content Liquidation, Property Management, Absentee Home Watch, Moving, Full Service Discount Real Estate Services, Home Sales, Home Buyer Services, and Elder Care Services. With Personal Property Managers, one call does it all.

 

Thinking of Downsizing?

Home Downsizing Tips – Room by Room

Don’t be overwhelmed with moving or cleaning out a home.

Bucks County Home Downsizing

Helping Seniors Move in PA NJMany people do not realize how to handle all of the various categories of things found in the common household and are overwhelmed with even beginning the process of moving or cleaning out a home after a loss of a loved one. Here are some examples of how many of the usual items often found in each room. This is part of a continuing series of helpful articles from Joe Santoro and Nick Santoro of Personal Property Managers to assist you in downsizing or moving from your home. Personal Property Managers services New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

Kitchen

  • Keep: Cooking related items you truly need or could use to upgrade what you have in your own kitchen.
  • Donate: Functional items in good condition or better – pots and pans, flatware, glassware, etc. – canned goods and other food may be donated to the local food pantry
  • Discard: Anything chipped, cracked, broken or worn beyond use including china, glass, dishes, old food in the refrigerator and canned goods and packaged food with expired dates
  • Recycle: Dirty, discolored, rusty cooking pots/pans, worn utensils, out-of-date and non-functioning small appliances
  • Sell: Vintage cookware, Le Creuset pots and pans, Fiestaware, Stangl plates and bowls, etc.

Bedrooms

  • Keep: Put family photos, heirloom jewelry and important personal paperwork in a safe place to take home to review closer and distribute to the appropriate family members
  • Donate: Clothing, shoes, accessories, linens, books to local libraries and retirement communities, paperbacks to our soldiers, hotel toiletries to homeless shelters
  • Discard: Undergarments, old toiletries, old medicine, used/old makeup, no value items from the “junk drawer”
  • Recycle: Eyeglasses, old electronics, wire coat hangers to your local dry cleaner, towels and blankets to your favorite animal shelter
  • Sell: Vintage jewelry, zippo cigarette lighters, coin collections, designer clothing to consignment shops

Living Room/Family Room/Den

  • Keep: Heirloom quality china, silver sets and artwork if desired
  • Donate: Lower value furniture, incomplete china sets, extra glassware, CD’s and DVD’s
  • Discard: Used candles, coasters, incomplete board games and puzzles
  • Recycle: Non confidential paperwork, magazines, newspapers, old greeting cards, soiled tablecloths and placemats
  • Sell: Crystal bowls, Hummel figurines, Lladro figurines and related collectibles

Office

  • Keep: Recent tax returns, home improvement records, current files
  • Donate: Old phones to our soldiers, outdated but working electronics to schools or charities
  • Discard: Office supplies that are no longer functional – Pens that don’t work, dried up erasers, etc.
  • Recycle: Obsolete fax machines, printers, power cords, old trade publications, ink cartridges
  • Sell: Furniture and higher-end electronics when updating/upgrading
  • Shred: Credit card statements, tax returns over 7 yrs old, bank statements, old confidential business/related records

Attic

  • Keep: Family memorabilia, personal items and other heirlooms
  • Donate: Clothing, picture frames, low-value knick knacks, books in better condition to your local library
  • Discard: Worn out suitcases, baby cribs and car seats, anything low value damaged by the heat and cold from sitting for years that can’t be recycled
  • Recycle: Rusty bed frame rails, corroded metal fans, non-confidential paperwork
  • Sell: Antiques, old dolls, vintage toys and trains, sports, movie and political memorabilia

Basement

  • Keep: Better quality hand and power tools and related machines and equipment if truly needed
  • Donate: Children’s toys, exercise equipment, games in good condition or better
  • Discard: Damp, musty, moldy books and record albums, broken modern toys
  • Recycle: Outdated electronics, rusty tools, old wiring, non-functioning dehumidifiers
  • Sell: Duplicate or unneeded tools, musical instruments that are no longer used, vintage stereos

Garage/Shed

  • Keep: Better quality hand and power tools, shelving and storage bins if needed
  • Donate: Vases to your local florist, extra garden tools to your neighbors
  • Discard: Sports equipment in poor condition, toys missing parts or broken
  • Recycle: Junk metals, hazardous waste, paint, old bicycles
  • Sell: Lawn mowers and snow blowers on Craigslist, sort and sell boxes of unwanted things from parents, grandparents and relatives sitting for years

For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with Every Home Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.

Top 7 tips to help you sell your home

Top seven tips and insights to help you successfully sell your home by Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers. Click here to view.

Joean NickNov2011

Tips to stage your home to sell it quicker

10 home staging tips to help sell your home

Are you planning to sell your home? Want to get the most for your home? Is there competition in your neighborhood with respect to other homes similar to yours for sale? How do you differentiate your home from the others on the market? Have you lived in your home for a number of years and have it decorated to your takes but are not sure if your taste will be compatible with a potential buyers? Do you have a life time of possessions filled with memories? Where do you begin? This can be an exhausting and overwhelming process. Don’t worry. We can help. We get calls all the time from people just like you.

This is part of a continuing series of articles and helpful tips and insights to help you with your home by Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers (www.personalpropertymanagers.com ) Personal Property Managers specializes in real estate sales and marketing, home downsizing, content clean out and removal and estate sales. We service Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

One of the areas you may want to focus on is a concept called home staging. This refers to how you have your home furnished and decorated and painted; the basic look and feel that your home presents itself to a potential buyer. It’s all about preparing your home to make it optimally ready for sale in today’s real estate marketplace.

Anything you can do to help buyers see your house in its best light will benefit you and shorten the selling cycle. Home staging is important and can raise the value of your home by as much as 5% to 15% according to various industry studies.

Here are 10 tips that you may want to consider for….

1. De-personalize your home; make it the buyers home
You want to prepare a home so that it invites a prospective buyer to see their family in it, not yours, so you want to de-personalize the home without making it cold. This means removing highly personal items like pictures and religious icons and bringing in things that are appealing to all humans, such as fresh flowers and attractive artwork.

2. Remove clutter from your home, make it look large
Today’s home buyers, particularly younger ones, don’t like clutter — they like clean, open spaces, which becomes particularly important for those selling older homes. The presence of clutter in the form of piles of old shoes, loads of personal pictures, or overloaded and jammed closets and cabinets and garages makes buyers feel like they’re invading the seller’s space and can also indicate to a buyer that the seller doesn’t want to or isn’t ready to move.

3. Neutralize your home
Paint colors should be more neutral to appeal to everyone so that the house feels expansive. You can bring in touches of color, but let the house be neutral and let each room have one focal point, such as the fireplace in the living room or the bed in the bedroom covered with a cream bedspread and red pillows so that it pops. White walls are safe in that they go well with everything and people won’t feel like they have to repaint right away, but they still prefer coffee-colored or another neutral-colored wall. Bright paint colors can turn people off, as can wallpaper, which buyers might see as a project to remove and which become items they start knocking off the selling price.

4. Go green with energy efficient appliances or windows
Today’s home buyers are more sensible and energy-conscious, which translates to a willingness to go smaller and/or renovate. They also have more of a respect and appreciation for energy-efficient and green design.

Make a great first impression in the foyer with a clean, open area and the use of mirrors, which bounce light back and make spaces look bigger. Hard wood floors today are more and more popular and desirable vs. carpeting of years ago

5. Don’t forget the outside of your home
Please remember that by the time a buyer views the inside of the home, they have already formed positive or negative opinions based on their experience outside. You don’t want to create negative impressions for buyers as they pull up to the house. Cracked driveways, broken trees, unclear mailbox numbers, or peeling paint can all detract from your homes value. You also want to maximize the front door experience by ensuring that buyers are met with good lighting, a working doorbell, attractive landscaping, and the absence of cobwebs. Curb appeal is king.

6. Smell check – sent matters
The scent of a home is important and you need to be able to smell your house. As silly as it may sound, do a ‘smell check’ or ask your realtor to do it for you, but pet odors, dampness in the basement, etc. need to be cleared.

7. Walk through with a fresh set of eyes
Sellers become blind to things in their home after 10 days such that they know where light switches are and how not to bump into furniture. When you’re staging, you need to see what your house looks like with fresh eyes — (or in) the eyes of a buyer.

8. Keep closets and storages areas clean
Buyers will open closets to see the storage space available, but it will also tell them a little about the homeowner. Cheap lighting or poor maintenance will tell them the extent to which sellers took care of, or invested in, the home and the seller mentality they might be dealing with.

9. Other areas to take a look at
Make sure that all beds are made, there are no dishes in the sink or clothes on the floor, areas are generally straightened up, and remove any traces of pets, such as dog toys or litter boxes.

10. Make the common sense staging investment
Don’t do more than the home value would justify, but we always tell sellers to consider investing one percent of the home’s asking price on staging activities such as painting a few rooms or staining the deck. These activities can add value to the home, make the highly emotional moving process easier for the seller, and help attract a new buyer who will love the home as much as the seller did.

At Personal Property Managers, we understand the emotional toll downsizing, moving or selling a home can take on our clients and their families. Our goal is to help you transition seamlessly to this exciting new chapter in life.

For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at http://www.personalpropertymanagers.com or simply give us a call at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping to home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with Every Home Realty.

7 Steps to Rapidley Sell and Stage Your home

7 Steps to Staging and Selling your Home

Are you getting ready to sell your home? Are you fully prepared? Do you want to move your property fast – and for the highest selling price possible? Well…you can with these 7 tips from Nick and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers (www.personalpropertymanagers.com ).  These easy, affordable staging tricks will help you sell your home and make your home attractive to the largest pool of potential buyers.

While the term has become more common over the past few years, home staging still remains a confusing concept for many people. What is it exactly, and how can it help with selling a home? When you sell your home, you want to appeal to the greatest number of potential buyers. This will help you get the best possible price, with the least amount of time on the market.

Home staging is how you get your home ready for sale so that it appeals to a large number of people. Most buyers are not able to envision a home’s true potential; as sellers or caregivers of elderly loved ones who want to or need to sell their home, we must create this vision for our buyers. Try to think of your house as a product for sale, and look at it objectively. It is now a “house” and not a home.

Staging accentuates the positive aspects of your home, and eliminates or downplays the negative features. Your beautifully staged home is only seven simple steps away.

1. Evaluate..take a good look at your home for the first time:

You need to tour your own home as if you were the buyer. We often become so used to our homes that we don’t notice the imperfections anymore. During your tour, take some notes, create and complete checklists of things to look for, and take pictures. These will help you pinpoint areas that need repair or improvement. Often you will see things in pictures that you didn’t notice while actually in the space. Another option is to ask for an objective opinion from friends, family members, or your real estate agent.

2. De-Clutter…keep it neat and simple:

This is the simplest and least expensive step, but is the one most frequently overlooked. Buyer don’t want to have the impression that they are buying your clutter and your mess. They want to envision their stuff in your clean and de-cluttered home. In reality, only 10% of buyers can see the potential of a home.

3Keep your Home Clean:

Once all the clutter is removed, give the house a thorough cleaning. If you absolutely hate cleaning, hire a professional cleaning service. Nothing turns buyers off more than someone else’s dirt.

4Repair & Update…if it’s broke…fix it:

In the first step, evaluate and take a fresh look, you were asked to take notes on areas that might need updating or repair. If you don’t complete the repairs buyers will wonder what else is wrong with the home. They fear that you didn’t take good care of the home and that there may be deferred maintenance.

There are many simple updates you can do. Most are minor projects, such as replacing outdated cabinet knobs. This is not the time to take on major renovations.

5. Neutralize…simplify and keep it clean:

You want buyers to be able to envision themselves living in the home. If your home looks too personal (such as family pictures everywhere….), buyers feel like they are intruding and won’t allow themselves to make an emotional connection with the home. Most of us buy with emotion and then justify with reason. If your home is too specific in taste or style it will not appeal to a wide range of buyers, no matter how beautiful it is.

6.Keep it Bright and Tidy….Accessorize:

Homes need to be clean, bright, airy, and spacious. Traffic should flow easily through and between the rooms. The furniture arrangement needs to make sense. Create a flow that draws your eye to the focal point of each room.

Accessorizing can be compared to putting on jewelry when getting dressed for a special dinner or party; it’s the little touches that have a big impact. Keep it simple, such as a vase of fresh flowers on the entry table.

7. Price & List

It is important to get the house in front of as many buyers as possible. The first ten days a home is on the market are the most critical because this is when excitement is the highest. Do your research and make sure you are setting the correct price. The number one reason a property doesn’t sell is because it is overpriced. Once a home is listed too high, the damage can’t be undone, even if the price is later dropped.

In addition to pricing a home correctly for a potential buyer, it is very important to consider that the vast majority of buyers will need bank financing / mortgage. Banks will look at comps when evaluating your potential purchase. So, even if you have a meeting of the mind between buyer and seller, the buyers bank or mortgage company may not approve the loan if it is priced well above market comps.

These seven steps will give you the best chance of selling success. One of the most compelling statistics on home staging is that the cost of staging is almost always less than the amount of the first price reduction. And how many times have you seen homes get not one, but multiple price reductions? Staging really does sell homes.

For more information on home sales, staging and downsizing, please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at www.personalpropertymanagers.com  or simply give us a call at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping to transition elderly ones from their home of many years into senior care communities. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, full service real estate services via its association with Every Home Realty to help sell homes.

11 Tips to Home Selling Success

Selling your home? 11 Tips to Achieve Success.

The real estate market has changed. We have weather the troubled times over the past 6 years. The market has settled and in many cases home values are on the rise. Here are a few tips to think about when listing and selling your home.

This is part of a continuing series of articles and insights by Nick and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers, www.personalpropertymanagers.com to help you with your real estate, downsizing, and senior transition service needs. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

1. Pictures. Pictures. Pictures. 92% of homebuyers start their house hunt online. In real estate, compelling means pictures! A study by several online real estate services shows that listings with more than 6 pictures are twice as likely to be viewed by buyers as listings that had fewer than 6 pictures.

2. Video.  In today’s market, while pictures are great, video’s are even better. Have you looked at YouTube recently? Consider posting a video online to highlight your home.

3. Social Media. Facebook is the great connector of people these days. If you have 200 friends and they each have 200 friends, imagine the power of that network in getting the word out about your house!

4. Beat the competition with the condition of your home. In many markets the way you can compete is on condition. Make sure that the little nicks and scratches, doorknobs that don’t work, and wonky handles are all repaired before you start showing your home.

5. Stage the exterior of your home too. Stage the exterior with fresh paint, immaculate landscaping and even outdoor furniture to set up a Sunday brunch on the deck vignette. Buyers often fantasize about enjoying their backyards by entertaining and spending time outside.

6. Access is essential. Homes that don’t get shown don’t get sold. Don’t make it difficult for agents to get their clients into your home – if they have to make appointments way in advance, or can only show it during a very restrictive time frame, they will likely just cross your place off the list and go show the places that are easy to get into.

7. The price must be right. Today’s buyers are very educated about the comparable sales in the area, which heavily influence the fair market value of your home. And they often know that they’re in the driver’s seat. To make your home competitive, have your broker or agent get you the sales prices of the three most similar homes that have sold in your area in the last month or so, then try to go 10-15% below that when you set your home’s list price. The homes that look like a great deal are the ones that get the most visits from buyers and, on occasion even receive multiple offers.

8. Get clued into your competition. Work with your broker or agent to get educated about the price, type of sale and condition of the other homes your home is up against. Attend some open houses in your area and do a real estate reality check: know that buyers that see your home will see those homes, too – make sure the real-time comparison will come out in your home’s favor by ensuring the condition of your home is up to par.

9. De-personalize. Do this – pretend you’re moving out. Take all the things that make your home “your” personal sanctuary (e.g., family photos, religious décor and kitschy memorabilia), pack them up and put them in storage. Buyers want to visualize your house being their house – and it’s difficult for them to do that with all your personal items marking the territory as yours.

10. De-clutter. Pack up all your little nick-knacks, anything that is sitting on top of a countertop, table or other flat surfaces. Anything that you haven’t used in at least a year? That goes, too. Give away what you can, throw away as much as possible of what remains, and then pack the rest to get it ready to move.

11. Listen to your agent. If you find an experienced real estate agent to list your home, who has a successful track record of selling homes in your area, listen to their recommendations! Find an agent you trust and follow their advice as often as you can.

For more information, please contact Nick or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers, at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909 www.personalpropertymanagers.com

Discover Your “Elder Care Transition Options”

Discover Your “Elder Care Transition Options”: 

Personal Property Managers, lead by its founders Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro services Pennsylvania and New Jersey.  Personal Property Managers can be found on the Net at www.personalpropertymanagers.com  Nick and Joe Santoro have hosted many seminars to help senior and their caregivers to avoid the overwhelming tasks of downsizing, estate sales, home staging, real estate sales and content moves to assist in transition and long term care of our nation’s elderly.  If you are a senior care community, an assisted living community, nursing home or local civic organization seeking insights into the transition process of caring for your elderly loved one from their homes of many years into a senior community than Personal Property Managers is available for free speaking and education seminars.

Many older people strive to stay in their home as long as possible. For some, a few alterations, such as ramps, lever handles and hand rails can create a safer and more manageable environment.

For others, staying in their home is no longer an option. It can be daunting and even overwhelming for seniors considering downsizing. “What to do with all this stuff”? “How do I prepare my house for sale”? “What is my home worth”? How can I move some of my contents from my home into a senior care community”? These are just a few of the things that Nick and Joe Santoro can help with during their seminars and question and answer sessions.

Personal Property Managers also works with elder care attorneys to handle questions dealing with topics such as Powers of Attorney, Estate Planning, Elder Care Law, Wills, Trusts and Medicaid to offer a complete picture of elder care coverage and assistance.

Please contact Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro, a certified Senior Real Estate Specialist and elder care transition specialist at Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909 via www.personalpropertymanagers.com to book free seminars or speaking engagements.