Tag Archives: seniors

Senior Hoarding – Signs and Game Plan

Senior Hoarding – Game Plan

Recognizing its signs and developing a game plan to address it

Helping Seniors Move in PA NJWe wanted to share with you an often confounding yet common situation when dealing with transitioning an elderly loved one from their home of many years into a senior care community, or perhaps your home or even settling their estate. We are specifically referring to senior hoarding. This is real and the condition is known as Diogenes syndrome, and it is more common than most people realize.

This is part of a continuing series of helpful articles from Joe Santoro and Nick Santoro of Personal Property Managers to assist you in home downsizing, content liquidation and full service discount real estate services. Personal Property Managers services clients in New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

Our senior loved ones are certainly part of the ‘greatest generation’ for sure. They have sacrificed for our nation, fought our wars, defended our freedom, were hard working Americans who put in long hours at work, saved and accumulated things over their lifetime. Now, as their caregiver, you may be faced with dealing with the task of trying to clean-up or sort through what they have accumulated over their lifetime. In many cases, the mass accumulation of things turns out to be senior hoarding. We often find homes with 4 or 5 blenders, toasters, lawnmowers, ladders, boxes of things that have never been opened or things never used and the list goes on and on…

Times have changed. Items that were valuable years ago are no longer desirable. Family members often have no use or desire to bring Grandma’s things to their home. Change can be hard, and sorting through a lifetime accumulation of possessions can be overwhelming to a senior who is already struggling with a loss of independence and to family members who are stressed out.

It is perfectly normal for an individual who has lived for many years in one location to acquire a lot of stuff, and for some individuals, letting go of the things they no longer need can be extremely difficult. Experts say seniors are prone to cluttering for a variety of reasons, including fear of loss, anxiety, and depression. Research also suggests that pre-Alzheimer’s personalities may trigger hoarding behavior, further complicating the issue for those already pre-disposed to this obsessive habit.

For families dealing with loved ones and parents who have slipped into a pattern of hoarding, it can be difficult to develop strategies for the kind of downsizing that is necessary to accommodate a move to senior housing. The individual may be ashamed of their living conditions, and reluctant to accept the help they need. They also may be fearful of being forced to let go of the items to which they have become attached and resist their family’s attempts at getting the clutter under control.

Of course, securing the homeowner’s consent and cooperation is only half the battle. Once you have the go-ahead to begin sorting through the collection, it is important to have a strategy for completing the task at hand. Here are a few suggestions for getting through the cleanup:

Call a professional. At Personal Property Managers, we specialize in helping families take stock of what they have, what is valuable or not and how to declutter. Often, going through an entire household after years of accumulation is simply too much for one person to undertake. Far better to work as a team with a common goal.

Set a date to start the project. Block off a section of your calendar when you can truly focus on the task at hand. Determine how long you will work, and then stick to the plan. You may not make it through the process entirely, but knowing you have a starting time, and a plan to wrap up the day’s work at a specific time, can help keep you on track.

Do it in chunks. Work room by room. Although you may have an entire house to wade through, you will do your best work by focusing on one room at a time. Besides, any large project is easier to complete if you divide it into smaller, more manageable tasks.

Use a system. Focus on the most used items. As you go through each room, set aside a place for each of the following: donations, keepsakes, items to be organized and put away, and trash. At the end of each workday, take time to put away the items you have chosen to keep. Be selective. Remember that you are downsizing, so make your selections carefully. You may actually need to go through this process twice as it is often difficult to make emotional decisions the first pass through.

Think about digitizing boxes and boxes of photos and photo albums.

Have donations and trash picked up promptly to prevent second guessing your selections. The sooner you have temptation removed, the better.

Once the cleanup is complete, check in often to make sure that day-to-day clutter is not getting out of control. Staying on top of the problem is far easier than wading through a year’s worth of accumulation, and maintaining a tidy living space will relieve stress for you and your loved one, as well as make the home safer for its inhabitants.

The good news is that we can help clean-out your house, help downsize family’s homes and liquidate your contents for items that are saleable and in demand. We offer on-site estate sale services and can remove contents and sell them via our array of proprietary resources. With Personal Property Managers…one call does it all.

For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with EveryHome Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.
Advertisements

How to recognize signs of delcine in our aging loved one

Recognizing signs of decline and the need for help of our elderly loved ones

Helping Seniors Move in PA NJAre you the close friend, son, daughter or caregiver of a senior loved one? Have you begun to notice signs that your elderly loved one is having difficulty processing routine daily chores; conversations, and or having trouble remembering name?

If the answer to any of these questions is yes… then this may mean that your elderly loved one may now need help, and may no longer be able to live independently.

Census figures and recent studies indicate that in the next 11 years, our elderly population will double. This means that caregivers and children of elderly loved ones will be dealing with a situation that for many is something that we are often not prepared for.

This is part of a continuing series of articles and helpful tips and insights into senior care and senior transition services by Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers. Personal Property Managers specializes in senior transition services such as downsizing, content clean out and removal, estate sales, full service real estate and property sale and moving.

While we are certainly not medical or health care professionals we often work with adult children and caregivers of elderly loved ones who are going through so form of lifestyle transition. We’ve put together a list of the top 9 signs that your elderly loved one may need some assistance, and whom you can reach out to for that help.

1. Memory loss and Forgetfulness
Have your parents have begun forgetting appointments or bills that need to be paid? Have they been getting lost more regularly? Maybe they have begun repeating themselves or putting common objects in illogical places. Perhaps they forget the dosage for their medicine, or don’t take it altogether.

If this is the case you might want to suggest a formal assessment to help determine your options. Once you know what is going on with your parent, such as is the issue a medical condition or dementia, you will better know how to help them.

2. Mobility issues
Are your parents having trouble walking or getting up from a chair? Take a look around your parents’ home. Is the staircase awkward to navigate, are there slippery tiles, does the furniture create obstacles or are they having trouble getting in and out of the shower? Muscle, joint pain or trouble with knees might indicate that a cane or walker is necessary.

3. Eating issues and loss of appetite Are your parents losing weight, becoming dehydrated, not cooking, forgetting to eat or eating unhealthy? They might be having trouble cooking, reading a recipe, holding utensils or operating a stove, or they may have difficulty with the senses of taste and smell. You may want to check the refrigerator for out of date food. Make sure your parents are drinking and not becoming dehydrated, especially during the heat of the summer.

4. Detachment and overall lack of involvement
Is your parent social and active, visiting friends, participating in faith, civic or community activities? Or are they listless with low spirits and a lack of energy? If you’re not sure why, why not simply ask them about it. It may mean eyes should be checked or a hearing aid might be in order.

5. Change in personal hygiene
Is your dad’s hair uncombed and teeth not brushed? Is he no longer going to the barber with usual regularity? Is he wearing the same clothing or inappropriate clothing? Lack of awareness about his personal appearance might be a sign of physical problems, depression or Alzheimers. Talk to your parents what you noticed and ask them about it.

6. Change in Personality
Do you notice a change in your parents’ personalities, especially in the evening? Are they talking too loudly or too softly? Are they accusing people of doing or saying things against them, wanting to check on children or displaying other odd behaviors? These may be common signs of sun downing or late-day confusion. You may want to plan activities during the day that include exposure to sunlight and keeping a nightlight on to reduce agitation. Changes in personality can result from other things aside from Alzheimers or dementia, which looks different in every individual. You may have to be creative and try multiple strategies to address changes in personality and meet your loved one’s needs.

7. Illness or Physical Disability
If your parents suffer from advanced diabetes or have visual difficulties, such as Parkinson’s or severe or recurring strokes, they may need you to step in.

8. Unusual Amount of Clutter
Is there dirty laundry or unopened mail? Is the house unkempt, especially in the kitchen and bathroom? Does the lawn need mowing? Maybe maintaining the home is becoming too much for your parents to handle.

9. Bruises, Scratches and Burns
Have you noticed unexplained bruises, bumps, scratches or burns? These may be signs your loved one is having difficulty taking care of themselves.

After being independent and self-sufficient for so long, it’s difficult for parents to admit they need help. But it’s important to communicate with your parents, letting them know why you are worried and that you want to help. Then come up with solutions together.

For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with Every Home Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.

How to Simplify your Life by Downsizing

How to Simplify your life by Downsizing – How to begin the process

Five Important Family Tips for Helping Seniors Clean, Organize and Downsizing their Home

Bucks County Home Downsizing

Helping Seniors Move in PA NJSimplify your life by downsizing – what you may be missing and beginning the process

Moving from your home often represents an emotional time in one’s life. Each room in the house and all its contents are associated with memories, which makes packing especially bittersweet. However, for those who are craving a more relaxed lifestyle, downsizing offers a variety of benefits.

This is part of a continuing series of articles by Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers, who service Pennsylvania and New Jersey and specialize in real estate, property management, home content downsizing and estate sale services.

First, remind yourself why you’re considering to downsize and move. The upkeep on a large home can become quite expensive, even after the mortgage is paid in full. When big-ticket items like new windows or a roof are needed, these repairs can quickly add up. Additionally, you realize that you have more space than you can possibly use and easily maintain. After children move out, there are often rooms that are used strictly as storage space, hardly ever to be set foot in again. Plus, it’s important to consider that the upkeep of a large home can easily become overwhelming in later years when tasks like raking leaves in the fall, cleaning a home top to bottom, and shoveling snow can become challenging or even dangerous.

After downsizing from your large home into a more suitable size to meet your current needs or moving into a senior living community or retirement neighborhood, most folks report a decrease in their stress levels. Many now have peace of mind knowing that they have less space to clean or living quarters all on one level. For those who move into a senior community this may include home maintenance which may now be the responsibility of someone else. For others who move into an assisted living community there is also comfort knowing that their future health care needs will also be met. Better yet…for many senior a downsizing move can lead to an opportunity to enjoy life-long learning and social networking where they can continue to grow relationships with others who share their interests is often a major perk

Joe Santoro shares that his parents who recently moved into an active adult community says that, “..every time I visited my parents I got the sense that my parents are having the time of their lives. There are so many activities within the community that even simple tasks like going to get their mail was an excuse to check in with their neighbors and hear all the latest news.”

Knowing When the Time is Right for Downsizing a Home
Considering a move to a senior living community before it becomes medically necessary is a smart decision that can help keep individuals as they continue down the path of aging. Joe points out that his parents did not realize all they are missing out on until they visited the community that they now live in.

5 Downsizing Tips for Seniors
After making the decision that it’s time to downsize and enjoy all that a retirement or senior care community has to offer, Joe points out that you must start preparing for moving day. It’s important to keep in mind that downsizing means not all belongings may be able to be brought to the new home. That’s where Personal Property Managers with its single source solution can help. PPM provides home cleanout, de-cluttering, estate sales and full service real estate services. For families considering downsizing, Joe says that you should keep the following tips in mind:

1. Ask for assistance. Start the process by asking family and friends for help. This may not be possible for many due to the mobile society we live in and the physical demands that a downsize can take. That’s were Personal Property Managers can help. Remember, moving can take a toll on even those in the most optimal health. You may also be surprised to learn the emotional attachment your adult children or grandchildren may have to certain items. Enjoy sharing memories with them as you go through the house together.

2. Keep the memories, not the items. Parting with belongings can be difficult due to the memories associated with them. You’ll need to make decisions about what to keep, what to donate to charity, what items to designate to family members, and what can simply be tossed.

3. Take your time. Packing up a home for a move is a challenging task for even the most able-bodied person. Therefore, keep in mind that it is probably not possible to go through the entire household in a single day – or even a week! As soon as the decision to downsize has been made, start sorting through smaller areas, like closets, drawers and storage spaces to quickly weed out items.

4. Write out lists. Lists are a great way to create a timeline and stay organized throughout the downsizing process. Make lists of rooms to go through and lists of items to pack, as well as lists for tasks like cancelling utilities and transferring mail.

5. Create a plan. Having a plan for moving day helps eliminate a lot of the stress of the day, so if possible, get a floorplan of the new living space. Knowing the exact dimension of the rooms helps map out what furniture can go where, as well as how much storage space is available.

For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with Every Home Realty. Learn more about Personal Property Managers from our recent News Stories.

Tips to stage your home to sell it quicker

10 home staging tips to help sell your home

Are you planning to sell your home? Want to get the most for your home? Is there competition in your neighborhood with respect to other homes similar to yours for sale? How do you differentiate your home from the others on the market? Have you lived in your home for a number of years and have it decorated to your takes but are not sure if your taste will be compatible with a potential buyers? Do you have a life time of possessions filled with memories? Where do you begin? This can be an exhausting and overwhelming process. Don’t worry. We can help. We get calls all the time from people just like you.

This is part of a continuing series of articles and helpful tips and insights to help you with your home by Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers (www.personalpropertymanagers.com ) Personal Property Managers specializes in real estate sales and marketing, home downsizing, content clean out and removal and estate sales. We service Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

One of the areas you may want to focus on is a concept called home staging. This refers to how you have your home furnished and decorated and painted; the basic look and feel that your home presents itself to a potential buyer. It’s all about preparing your home to make it optimally ready for sale in today’s real estate marketplace.

Anything you can do to help buyers see your house in its best light will benefit you and shorten the selling cycle. Home staging is important and can raise the value of your home by as much as 5% to 15% according to various industry studies.

Here are 10 tips that you may want to consider for….

1. De-personalize your home; make it the buyers home
You want to prepare a home so that it invites a prospective buyer to see their family in it, not yours, so you want to de-personalize the home without making it cold. This means removing highly personal items like pictures and religious icons and bringing in things that are appealing to all humans, such as fresh flowers and attractive artwork.

2. Remove clutter from your home, make it look large
Today’s home buyers, particularly younger ones, don’t like clutter — they like clean, open spaces, which becomes particularly important for those selling older homes. The presence of clutter in the form of piles of old shoes, loads of personal pictures, or overloaded and jammed closets and cabinets and garages makes buyers feel like they’re invading the seller’s space and can also indicate to a buyer that the seller doesn’t want to or isn’t ready to move.

3. Neutralize your home
Paint colors should be more neutral to appeal to everyone so that the house feels expansive. You can bring in touches of color, but let the house be neutral and let each room have one focal point, such as the fireplace in the living room or the bed in the bedroom covered with a cream bedspread and red pillows so that it pops. White walls are safe in that they go well with everything and people won’t feel like they have to repaint right away, but they still prefer coffee-colored or another neutral-colored wall. Bright paint colors can turn people off, as can wallpaper, which buyers might see as a project to remove and which become items they start knocking off the selling price.

4. Go green with energy efficient appliances or windows
Today’s home buyers are more sensible and energy-conscious, which translates to a willingness to go smaller and/or renovate. They also have more of a respect and appreciation for energy-efficient and green design.

Make a great first impression in the foyer with a clean, open area and the use of mirrors, which bounce light back and make spaces look bigger. Hard wood floors today are more and more popular and desirable vs. carpeting of years ago

5. Don’t forget the outside of your home
Please remember that by the time a buyer views the inside of the home, they have already formed positive or negative opinions based on their experience outside. You don’t want to create negative impressions for buyers as they pull up to the house. Cracked driveways, broken trees, unclear mailbox numbers, or peeling paint can all detract from your homes value. You also want to maximize the front door experience by ensuring that buyers are met with good lighting, a working doorbell, attractive landscaping, and the absence of cobwebs. Curb appeal is king.

6. Smell check – sent matters
The scent of a home is important and you need to be able to smell your house. As silly as it may sound, do a ‘smell check’ or ask your realtor to do it for you, but pet odors, dampness in the basement, etc. need to be cleared.

7. Walk through with a fresh set of eyes
Sellers become blind to things in their home after 10 days such that they know where light switches are and how not to bump into furniture. When you’re staging, you need to see what your house looks like with fresh eyes — (or in) the eyes of a buyer.

8. Keep closets and storages areas clean
Buyers will open closets to see the storage space available, but it will also tell them a little about the homeowner. Cheap lighting or poor maintenance will tell them the extent to which sellers took care of, or invested in, the home and the seller mentality they might be dealing with.

9. Other areas to take a look at
Make sure that all beds are made, there are no dishes in the sink or clothes on the floor, areas are generally straightened up, and remove any traces of pets, such as dog toys or litter boxes.

10. Make the common sense staging investment
Don’t do more than the home value would justify, but we always tell sellers to consider investing one percent of the home’s asking price on staging activities such as painting a few rooms or staining the deck. These activities can add value to the home, make the highly emotional moving process easier for the seller, and help attract a new buyer who will love the home as much as the seller did.

At Personal Property Managers, we understand the emotional toll downsizing, moving or selling a home can take on our clients and their families. Our goal is to help you transition seamlessly to this exciting new chapter in life.

For more information on real estate or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at http://www.personalpropertymanagers.com or simply give us a call at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping to home owners transition from their home of many years into a new community. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, discount full service real estate services via its association with Every Home Realty.

When to have a discussion about finances with your parents

When to have a discussion about finances with your parents

We often work with families where children are caregivers for their parents. Inevitably, the conversation of finances comes up. This is often a difficult and awkward discussion.

Recent studies by a variety of financial institutions showed that almost two-thirds of parents and their adult children1 are at odds as to when detailed conversations on key financial topics, including retirement preparedness, eldercare and estate planning, should take place.

Even more concerning, is the gap between parents concern and their adult children’s concern about finances. Studies show that about 55% of adult children worry about their parents finances vs. only about 25% of their parents. The rising cost of health care and senior care is now a cause for major concern. It is a fact that we are living longer but more often than not, our elderly loved ones will require long term senior care which can cost up to $100,000 per year.

This is part of a continuing series of articles and helpful tips and insights into senior care and senior transition services by Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers (www.personalpropertymanagers.com ) Personal Property Managers specializes in senior transition services such as downsizing, content clean out and removal, estate sales, full service real estate and property sale and moving.

We have learned that these discussions [between parent and adult children] aren’t always easy, but there can be real emotional and financial consequences when they don’t happen. It’s important that families take the time to sort through important matters related to retirement preparedness, care giving responsibilities, estate planning and the tax implications of an inheritance.

Census figures and recent studies indicate that in the next 11 years, our elderly population will double. This means that caregivers and children of elderly loved ones will be dealing with a situation that for many, is something that we are totally unprepared for.

How to Build a Better Discussion
Start the conversation and ask as many detailed questions as you can. 93 % of parents who had detailed discussions with their children about wills and estate planning say it brought greater peace of mind; 73 percent said it would help their children’s emotional state of mind, too.
Parents should have final say. While family members should have a role in the planning process, make sure the ultimate decisions made are consistent with the wishes of the parents, who are charting the course of their retirement.
The right people and the right topics. Advanced planning can help you define roles, determine what conversations to have, and choose when and how different people will be involved. For example who will have the power of attorney or be the executor of the estate? It is important to consider the personalities of each child, their proximity and their relationship with their parents.
Follow-up and keep the dialogue going. These conversations are not “one and done.” Keep the momentum going and schedule as many get-togethers as you need—and revisit the plans you make at least annually, to make sure they still make sense.

For more information on helping seniors in transition or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at http://www.personalpropertymanagers.com or simply give us a call at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping to transition elderly ones from their home of many years into senior care communities. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, full service real estate services via its association with Every Home Realty to help sell homes with proceeds going towards paying for the long term care of elderly loved ones and moving services

Recognizing signs of decline in our elderly loved ones

Recognizing signs of decline in our elderly loved ones

Are you the close friend, son, daughter or caregiver of a senior loved one? Have you begun to notice signs that your elderly loved one is having difficulty processing routing daily chores; conversations, and having trouble remembering name?  

If the answer to any of these questions is yes…then this may mean that your elderly loved one may now need help, and may no longer be able to live independently.

Census figures and recent studies indicate that in the next 11 years, our elderly population will double. This means that caregivers and children of elderly loved ones will be dealing with a situation that for many, is something that we are prepared for. .

This is part of a continuing series of articles and helpful tips and insights into senior care and senior transition services by Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers (www.personalpropertymanagers.com )  Personal Property Managers specializes in senior transition services such as downsizing, content clean out and removal, estate sales, full service real estate and property sale and moving.

Here are ten signs that your parents may need help right now — and who you can reach out to for that help.

  1.  Memory loss and Forgetfulness
    Have your parents have begun forgetting appointments or bills that need to be paid? Have they been getting lost more regularly? Maybe they have begun repeating themselves or putting common objects in illogical places. Perhaps they forget the dosage for their medicine, or don’t take it altogether.

If this is the case you might want to suggest a formal assessment to help determine your options. Once you know what is going on with your parent, such as is the issue a medical condition or dementia, you will better know how to help them. 

  1. Mobility issues
    Are your parents having trouble walking or getting up from a chair? Take a look around  your parents’ home. Is the staircase awkward to navigate, are there slippery tiles, does the furniture create obstacles or are they having trouble getting in and out of the shower? Muscle, joint pain or trouble with knees might indicate that a cane or walker is necessary.

 

  1.   Eating issues and loss of appetite
    Are your parents losing weight, becoming dehydrated, not cooking, forgetting to eat or eating unhealthy? They might be having trouble cooking, reading a recipe, holding utensils or operating a stove, or they may have difficulty with the senses of taste and smell. You may want to check the refrigerator for out of date food. Make sure your parents are drinking and not becoming dehydrated, especially during the heat of the summer.

    .

  2.   Detachment and overall lack of involvement
    Is your parent social and active, visiting friends, participating in faith, civic or community activities? Or are they listless with low spirits and a lack of energy? If you’re not sure why, why not simply ask them about it. It may mean eyes should be checked or a hearing aid might be in order.

 

  1.  Change in personal hygiene
    Is your dad’s hair uncombed and teeth not brushed? Is he no longer going to the barber with usual regularity? Is he wearing the same clothing or inappropriate clothing? Lack of awareness about his personal appearance might be a sign of physical problems, depression or Alzheimer’s. Talk to your parents what you noticed and ask them about it.
  2.  Change in Personality
    Do you notice a change in your parents’ personalities, especially in the evening? Are they talking too loudly or too softly? Are they accusing people of doing or saying things against them, wanting to check on children or displaying other odd behaviors? These may be common signs of sun downing or late-day confusion. You may want to plan activities during the day that include exposure to sunlight and keeping a nightlight on to reduce agitation. Changes in personality can result from other things aside from Alzheimer’s or dementia, which looks different in every individual. You may have to be creative and try multiple strategies to address changes in personality and meet your loved one’s needs. 
  3.   Illness or Physical Disability
    If your parents suffer from advanced diabetes or have visual difficulties, such as Parkinson’s or severe or recurring strokes, they may need you to step in. 

 

  1.   Unusual Amount of Clutter
    Is there dirty laundry or unopened mail? Is the house unkempt, especially in the kitchen and bathroom? Does the lawn need mowing? Maybe maintaining the home is becoming too much for your parents to handle.

.

  1.   Bruises, Scratches and Burns
    Have you noticed unexplained bruises, bumps, scratches or burns? These may be signs your loved one is having difficulty taking care of themselves.

After being independent and self-sufficient for so long, it’s difficult for parents to admit they need help. But it’s important to communicate with your parents, letting them know why you are worried and that you want to help. Then come up with solutions together.

For more information on helping seniors in transition or home downsizing please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at www.personalpropertymanagers.com  or simply give us a call at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping to transition elderly ones from their home of many years into senior care communities. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, full service real estate services via its association with Every Home Realty to help sell homes with proceeds going towards paying for the long term care of elderly loved ones and moving services

10 Tips on How to Conduct an Estate Sale

10 Tips on How to Conduct an Estate Sale

The spring season is upon us. This is a time of new beginnings and a time for change. For many homeowners this is the start of the spring home selling season. For seniors this may be a time of transition. This may also mean a transition from your home of many years into an active adult community or a senior care facility.

This often raises the question of what to do with your home contents. Do you want to keep them and bring them with you to your new home or do you want a change as you transition into your new home? If you want a change, and want to look into buying new furniture, then this presents another challenge; what to do with your current furniture and your other household contents?

Exploring an Estate Sale is one option.

This is part of a continuing series of article and helpful tips and insights into senior care and senior transition services by Nick Santoro and Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers (www.personalpropertymanagers.com )  Personal Property Managers specializes in senior transition services such as downsizing, content clean out and removal, estate sales, full service real estate and property sale and moving.

Selling the house, de-cluttering, cleaning-up and clearing-out your house and its contents can be both an exciting and daunting challenge. With the cost of senior care and perhaps moving into an active adult community being extremely expensive, the desire to maximize the value of a lifetime of memories becomes especially important.

With the help of an Estate Sale professional such as Personal Property Managers (http://www.personalpropertymanagers.com/estate_sale_liquidation_services.htm ) the desire to convert a lifetime of possessions into cash can become a reality.

One of the first steps in downsizing is to recognize that not all the belongings you have in your current home can fit into your new home. Often parents would like to pass their belongings to their children. This presents  another challenge, because their  grown kids are often very busy or have totally different tastes. As a result, many parents will simply throw away, give away or donate everything in a belief that these items have no real value to others.  Nick Santoro of Personal Property Managers, a certified Estate Sale specialist says that you’ll be surprised as to what people will actually buy at an Estate Sale if it is conducted properly and advertised and promoted professionally. Nick says that one person’s trash is another person’s treasure.  

Nick Santoro advises his Personal Property Managers Estate Sale clients that to get the most of out of your Estate Sale, clients should consider his 10 Estate Sale tips:

  1. When client are trying to sell something, they should think like a buyer. Make believe that the shoe is on the other foot, and set up your sale accordingly.
  2. The success of an Estate Sale will depend on three things – 1) marketing; to create awareness, 2) selection of items for sale with lots and lots of pictures (to be included in your advertising) and 3) realistic and attractive prices to get people to buy; remembering that what one paid for an item and what it will sell for at an Estate Sale are often two very different price points.
  3. Selection – an estate sale should encompass a household of different items (furniture, appliances, tools and more), placed in an attractive and clean display, and staged to bring focus to the items that are most likely to catch people’s eye.
  4. Pricing Estate Sale items at reasonable and realistic price points is critical. As a general rule of thumb, this usually means items may sell for about 20% of original cost…but this is a very general rule and depends on many conditions such as its condition, its uniqueness, its value and so on. Although many items will have great sentimental value or may have cost a lot originally, they will most likely not be worth as much to potential buyers as they are to you. Take the time to research various websites to make educated and professional price comparisons.
  5. Understand that an estate sale is really a full house version of a garage sale. Things are spread throughout the entire home, not just the driveway. It is important to have professionals cover the entire home as salespeople and for security to avoid theft.  
  6. Be prepared to negotiate. Negotiating prices is the foundation of every garage sale and estate sale.  
  7. Valuables like gold, precious stones or signed artwork should be tested and appraised, or left out of the sale. Estate sale buyers may not be the right buyers for true valuables. You may need to find more specialized sources to sell these.
  8. Proper Estate Sale promotion, marketing and advertising is critical to an Estate Sales success. Personal Property Managers designs special web pages dedicated to each of their client’s individual estate sale and then promotes them on a host of Estate Sale Websites and other proprietary venues. You’ll want to draw as much attention to the sale as possible by using signs along public roads. We have found that 40-50% of your buyers will come from the signs, so large noticeable signs with proper messaging and strategic placement is very important.  
  9. Prepare a fanny pack for each staff member with sales materials to keep the sale running efficiently and smoothly.
  10. Hand out tickets starting an hour or so prior to the sale to allow access on a first come, first serve basis. Make sure to only allow enough people in at a time to follow fire department regulations.

Personal Property Managers, LLC (www.personalpropertymanagers.com ) can help you in the process of asset liquidation, Estate Sales and moving. At Personal Property Managers we specialize in downsizing, content removal and liquidation, Real Estate / property sales and moving. With one call, Personal Property Managers does it all.

For more information please contact Nick Santoro or Joe Santoro of Personal Property Managers at www.personalpropertymanagers.com  or simply give us a call at 215-485-9272 or 908-368-1909. Personal Property Managers specializes in helping to transition elderly ones from their home of many years into senior care communities. Personal Property Managers services Pennsylvania and New Jersey and offers downsizing services, estate sales services, home staging, full service real estate services via its association with Every Home Realty to help sell homes and their contents.